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Vytorin is used for treating high cholesterol along with a cholesterol-lowering diet. Vytorin is a combination of 2 medicines. Ezetimibe works by reducing the amount of cholesterol that your body absorbs from your diet. Simvastatin is an HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor or "statin." It works by blocking an enzyme that is necessary for your body to make cholesterol. Lowering cholesterol levels in the blood reduces the chance of heart disease, heart attacks, and strokes. Vytorin has not been shown to reduce heart attacks or strokes more than simvastatin alone.

Use Vytorin as directed by your doctor.

Take Vytorin by mouth with or without food, preferably in the evening, unless directed otherwise by your doctor.

Taking Vytorin at the same time each day will help you remember to take it.

If you also take a bile acid sequestrant (eg, cholestyramine, colestipol, colesevelam), do not take it within 2 hours before or 4 hours after taking Vytorin. Check with your doctor if you have questions.

For best results, Vytorin should be used along with exercise, a low-cholesterol/low-fat diet, and a weight-loss program if you are overweight. Follow the diet and exercise program given to you by your health care provider.

Eating grapefruit or drinking grapefruit juice may increase the amount of Vytorin in your blood, which may increase your risk for serious side effects. The risk may be greater with large amounts of grapefruit or grapefruit juice. Avoid large amounts of grapefruit or grapefruit juice (eg, more than one quart daily). Talk with your doctor or pharmacist if you have questions about including grapefruit or grapefruit juice in your diet while you are taking Vytorin.

Most people with high cholesterol do not feel sick. Continue to take Vytorin even if you feel well. Do not miss any doses.

If you miss a dose of Vytorin, take it as soon as possible. If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to your regular dosing schedule. Do not take 2 doses at once.

Ask your health care provider any questions you may have about how to use Vytorin.

Store Vytorin at room temperature, between 68 and 77 degrees F (20 and 25 degrees C). Store away from heat, moisture, and light. Do not store in the bathroom. Keep Vytorin out of the reach of children and away from pets.

Active Ingredients: Ezetimibe, Simvastatin.

Do NOT use Vytorin if:

you are allergic to any ingredient in Vytorin

you have liver problems or ongoing abnormal liver function test results

you are taking another medicine that contains simvastatin or ezetimibe

you are taking an HIV protease inhibitor (eg, nelfinavir, lopinavir, ritonavir), itraconazole, ketoconazole, a macrolide or ketolide antibiotic (eg, clarithromycin, erythromycin, troleandomycin), mibefradil, or nefazodone

you are pregnant or breast-feeding.

Contact your doctor or health care provider right away if any of these apply to you.

Some medical conditions may interact with Vytorin. Tell your doctor or pharmacist if you have any medical conditions, especially if any of the following apply to you:

if you are pregnant, planning to become pregnant, or are breast-feeding

if you are taking any prescription or nonprescription medicine, herbal preparation, or dietary supplement

if you have allergies to medicines, foods, or other substances

if you are a woman of childbearing age

if you have kidney problems, muscle problems, or a family history of muscle problems; low blood pressure; uncontrolled seizures; or serious metabolic, endocrine, or electrolyte problems

if you are scheduled for major surgery, have recently had a major trauma, or have a severe infection or history of alcohol abuse

if you have had an organ transplant and are taking medicine to suppress a rejection reaction.

Some medicines may interact with Vytorin. Tell your health care provider if you are taking any other medicines, especially any of the following:

Amiodarone, angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors (eg, enalapril), azole antifungals (eg, itraconazole, ketoconazole), cyclosporine, danazol, delavirdine, diltiazem, fibrates (eg, clofibrate, fenofibrate), fluconazole, gemfibrozil, HIV protease inhibitors (eg, ritonavir), imatinib, macrolide antibiotics (eg, erythromycin), macrolide immunosuppressives (eg, tacrolimus), mibefradil, nefazodone, niacin, nicotinic acid, streptogramins, telithromycin, verapamil, or voriconazole because side effects, such as muscle pain, may occur

Bosentan, carbamazepine, cholestyramine, hydantoins (eg, phenytoin), rifampin, or St. John's wort because they may decrease Vytorin's effectiveness

Anticoagulants (eg, warfarin) because the risk of their side effects may be increased by Vytorin.

This may not be a complete list of all interactions that may occur. Ask your health care provider if Vytorin may interact with other medicines that you take. Check with your health care provider before you start, stop, or change the dose of any medicine.

Important safety information:

Vytorin may cause dizziness, drowsiness, or changes in vision. These effects may be worse if you take it with alcohol or certain medicines. Use Vytorin with caution. Do not drive or perform other possible unsafe tasks until you know how you react to it.

It may take several weeks for Vytorin to work.

Proper dental care is important while you are taking Vytorin. Brush and floss your teeth and visit the dentist regularly.

Vytorin may harm your liver. Your risk may be greater if you drink alcohol while you are using Vytorin. Talk to your doctor before you take Vytorin or other fever reducers if you drink more than 3 drinks with alcohol per day.

Vytorin may cause injury to your muscles, especially when taken at higher doses or when taken with certain other medicines. Contact your doctor right away if you experience muscle pain, tenderness, or weakness, especially with a fever.

Some patients taking Vytorin have reported poor memory or trouble sleeping. If you experience these effects, check with your doctor.

Lab tests, including blood cholesterol levels, liver function tests, or muscle tests, may be performed while you use Vytorin. These tests may be used to monitor your condition or check for side effects. Be sure to keep all doctor and lab appointments.

Vytorin should be used with extreme caution in children younger 10 years; safety and effectiveness in these children have not been confirmed.

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Do not use Vytorin if you are pregnant. Avoid becoming pregnant while you are taking it. If you think you may be pregnant, contact your doctor right away. It is not known if Vytorin is found in breast milk. Do not breastfeed while taking Vytorin.

All medicines may cause side effects, but many people have no, or minor, side effects.

Check with your doctor if any of these most common side effects persist or become bothersome:

Diarrhea; flu-like symptoms; headache; pain in the arms or legs; tiredness; upper respiratory tract infection.

Seek medical attention right away if any of these severe side effects occur:

Severe allergic reactions (rash; hives; itching; difficulty breathing or swallowing; tightness in the chest; swelling of the mouth, face, lips, or tongue); blurred vision or vision changes; change in the amount of urine; chest pain; dark urine; depression; fast heartbeat; fever; loss of appetite; muscle tenderness, pain, or weakness; nausea; numbness, tingling, burning, or weakness in the arms, hands, feet, or legs; pale stools; stomach tenderness; unexplained pain in the stomach or mid-upper back; unusual bruising or bleeding; unusual tiredness; vomiting; yellowing of the skin or eyes.

This is not a complete list of all side effects that may occur. If you have questions about side effects, contact your health care provider.

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Letrozole oral uses, side effects, interactions, pictures, warnings - dosing, letrosol

letrozole

GENERIC NAME(S): LETROZOLE

Uses

This medication is used to treat certain types of breast cancer (such as hormone-receptor-positive breast cancer ) in women after menopause. Letrozole is also used to help prevent the cancer from returning. Some breast cancers are made to grow faster by a natural hormone called estrogen. Letrozole decreases the amount of estrogen the body makes and helps to slow or reverse the growth of these breast cancers.

OTHER USES: This section contains uses of this drug that are not listed in the approved professional labeling for the drug but that may be prescribed by your health care professional. Use this drug for a condition that is listed in this section only if it has been so prescribed by your health care professional.

This medication may also be used to treat infertility in women.

How to use letrozole

Read the Patient Information Leaflet provided by your pharmacist before you start using letrozole and each time you get a refill. If you have any questions, consult your doctor or pharmacist.

Take this medication by mouth. usually once daily with or without food or as directed by your doctor.

Dosage is based on your medical condition and response to treatment.

Use this medication regularly to get the most benefit from it. To help you remember, take it at the same time each day.

Since this drug can be absorbed through the skin and lungs. women who are pregnant should not handle this medication or breathe the dust from the tablets. (See also Precautions section.)

Inform your doctor right away if your condition worsens (such as you get new breast lumps).

Side Effects

Remember that your doctor has prescribed this medication because he or she has judged that the benefit to you is greater than the risk of side effects. Many people using this medication do not have serious side effects.

Tell your doctor right away if you have any serious side effects, including: bone fractures. mental/mood changes (such as depression. anxiety ), swelling of arms/legs, blurred vision. persistent nausea/vomiting. unusual tiredness, dark urine, yellowing eyes /skin..

This medication (and cancer ) may rarely cause serious problems from blood clots (such as heart attack or stroke ). Get medical help right away if you experience: sudden shortness of breath, chest/jaw/left arm pain, confusion, coughing up blood. sudden dizziness/fainting. pain/swelling/warmth in the groin/calf. tingling/weakness /numbness in the arms/legs, slurred speech, weakness on one side of the body, vision changes, sudden/severe headache .

A very serious allergic reaction to this drug is rare. However, get medical help right away if you notice any symptoms of a serious allergic reaction. including: rash. itching /swelling (especially of the face/tongue /throat/neck), severe dizziness, trouble breathing .

This is not a complete list of possible side effects. If you notice other effects not listed above, contact your doctor or pharmacist.

Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088 or at www. fda. gov/medwatch.

In Canada - Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to Health Canada at 1-866-234-2345.

Precautions

Before taking letrozole, tell your doctor or pharmacist if you are allergic to it; or to anastrozole ; or if you have any other allergies. This product may contain inactive ingredients, which can cause allergic reactions or other problems. Talk to your pharmacist for more details.

Before using this medication, tell your doctor or pharmacist your medical history, especially of: high blood fats (cholesterol), bone problems (such as osteopenia, osteoporosis), stroke or blood clots, heart disease (such as chest pain, heart attack, heart failure), high blood pressure, kidney problems, liver problems.

This drug may make you dizzy and tired, and may rarely cause blurred vision. Do not drive, use machinery, or do any activity that requires alertness or clear vision until you are sure you can perform such activities safely. Limit alcoholic beverages.

Before having surgery, tell your doctor or dentist about all the products you use (including prescription drugs, nonprescription drugs, and herbal products).

This medication must not be used during pregnancy. It may harm an unborn baby. Letrozole is used mainly in women after menopause. If you have recently gone through menopause, discuss the need for use of reliable forms of birth control with your doctor. Do not use birth control products containing estrogen. Consult your doctor for more details. If you become pregnant or think you may be pregnant, tell your doctor right away. (See also How to Use section.)

It is not known whether this drug passes into breast milk and may harm a nursing infant. Breast-feeding while using this drug is not recommended. Consult your doctor before breast-feeding.

Interactions

Drug interactions may change how your medications work or increase your risk for serious side effects. This document does not contain all possible drug interactions. Keep a list of all the products you use (including prescription/nonprescription drugs and herbal products) and share it with your doctor and pharmacist. Do not start, stop, or change the dosage of any medicines without your doctor's approval.

Some products that may interact with this drug include: estrogens (such as ethinyl estradiol, conjugated estrogens), estrogen blockers (such as anastrozole, tamoxifen).

Overdose

If overdose is suspected, contact a poison control center or emergency room right away. US residents can call their local poison control center at 1-800-222-1222. Canada residents can call a provincial poison control center.

Notes

Do not share this medication with others.

Laboratory and/or medical tests (such as bone density tests, cholesterol levels, liver function tests) should be performed periodically to monitor your progress or check for side effects. Consult your doctor for more details.

This medication can increase the risk of bone loss (osteoporosis). Talk with your doctor about your risk, and about available treatments for osteoporosis. Lifestyle changes that reduce the risk of bone loss include doing weight-bearing exercise, getting enough calcium and vitamin D, stopping smoking, and limiting alcohol.

Missed Dose

If you miss a dose, take it as soon as you remember. If it is near the time of the next dose, skip the missed dose and resume your usual dosing schedule. Do not double the dose to catch up.

Storage

Store at room temperature away from light and moisture. Do not store in the bathroom. Keep all medications away from children and pets.

Do not flush medications down the toilet or pour them into a drain unless instructed to do so. Properly discard this product when it is expired or no longer needed. Consult your pharmacist or local waste disposal company.

Information last revised October 2015. Copyright(c) 2015 First Databank, Inc.

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Selected from data included with permission and copyrighted by First Databank, Inc. This copyrighted material has been downloaded from a licensed data provider and is not for distribution, expect as may be authorized by the applicable terms of use.

CONDITIONS OF USE: The information in this database is intended to supplement, not substitute for, the expertise and judgment of healthcare professionals. The information is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, drug interactions or adverse effects, nor should it be construed to indicate that use of a particular drug is safe, appropriate or effective for you or anyone else. A healthcare professional should be consulted before taking any drug, changing any diet or commencing or discontinuing any course of treatment.

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Important Notice: The Drugs. com international database is in BETA release. This means it is still under development and may contain inaccuracies. It is not intended as a substitute for the expertise and judgement of your physician, pharmacist or other healthcare professional. It should not be construed to indicate that the use of any medication in any country is safe, appropriate or effective for you. Consult with your healthcare professional before taking any medication.

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Pronunciation note Expand

The word tenet. defined here, should not be hard to pronounce. For speakers of American English, say the number ten, then add the pronoun it. and you have tenet. pronounced (ten ? it). Unfortunately, there is a similar-looking and similar-sounding word in English that is much more common—the word tenant. meaning someone who rents and occupies an apartment, office, etc. This word is pronounced (ten ? ?nt), and its pronunciation is frequently used in error by people who intend to say tenet. Because both words involve sequences of the same letters t and n — both of which are pronounced with the tongue in the same place, touching the upper palate—it is easy for the extra n of the more common word tenant to creep into the pronunciation of tenet. With care, one can learn to pronounce these two words differently and appropriately.

Dictionary. com Unabridged Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2016. Cite This Source

Examples from the Web for tenet Expand

Asked who would have made the order, Clarke replies, “I would think it would have been made by the director,” referring to tenet .

When tenet was asked whether it was appropriate to describe Ciralsky that way, tenet answered, “No.”

"Thou shalt not overspend" is rapidly becoming a tenet of the evangelical belief system, rivaling social issues like gay marriage.

"Well, they could die," tenet remembers telling Black about his staff.

By late Jan. 2003, tenet had signed the first formal guidelines for interrogation and confinement.

The splendid creature felt the warmth of tenet 's breath upon her neck, and her skin tingled under that burning contact.

He was as unconscious, almost, as he had been back there in tenet 's cabin after his fall.

A notable contrast is afforded by the entry: 'In villa que vocatur Blot tenet ipse R. iiii.

Was it something in a cast of character or a tenet of a creed, or was it what any one could emulate?

Dogma, dog?ma, n. a settled opinion: a principle or tenet . a doctrine laid down with authority.

British Dictionary definitions for tenet Expand

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Important Notice: The Drugs. com international database is in BETA release. This means it is still under development and may contain inaccuracies. It is not intended as a substitute for the expertise and judgement of your physician, pharmacist or other healthcare professional. It should not be construed to indicate that the use of any medication in any country is safe, appropriate or effective for you. Consult with your healthcare professional before taking any medication.

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Metronidazole

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Important Notice: The Drugs. com international database is in BETA release. This means it is still under development and may contain inaccuracies. It is not intended as a substitute for the expertise and judgement of your physician, pharmacist or other healthcare professional. It should not be construed to indicate that the use of any medication in any country is safe, appropriate or effective for you. Consult with your healthcare professional before taking any medication.

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Cutivate topical uses, side effects, interactions, pictures, warnings - dosing, cutivate

Cutivate topical

Uses

This medication is used to treat a variety of skin conditions (such as eczema. psoriasis. rash ). Fluticasone reduces swelling (inflammation ), itching. and redness. This medication is a medium-strength corticosteroid. It is available in several forms, including cream, ointment, and lotion. Your doctor will choose the type of product based on your skin condition and the area of your body to be treated.

Fluticasone ointment is not recommended for use by children because of the risk of serious side effects.

How to use Cutivate topical

Use this medication on the skin only. However, do not use it on the face, groin, or underarms, or for diaper rash. unless directed to do so by your doctor.

Wash and dry your hands before using. Clean and dry the affected area. Apply a thin film of medication to the affected area and gently rub in, usually once or twice daily as directed by your doctor. Do not bandage, cover, or wrap the area unless directed to do so by your doctor. If used near the diaper area on an infant. do not use tight-fitting diapers or plastic pants.

Wash your hands after each use, unless you are using this medication to treat the hands. Avoid getting this medication in your eyes because it may worsen or cause glaucoma. Also avoid getting it in your nose or mouth. If medication gets in these areas, rinse with plenty of water.

Use this medication only for the condition prescribed. Do not apply large amounts of this medication, use it more often, or use it for longer than prescribed. Your condition will not improve any faster, and your risk of side effects may increase.

Tell your doctor if your condition does not improve in 2 weeks or if it worsens.

Side Effects

Burning, itching. stinging, or dryness may occur when you apply this medication, but usually only lasts a short time. If any of these effects persist or worsen, tell your doctor or pharmacist promptly.

Remember that your doctor has prescribed this medication because he or she has judged that the benefit to you is greater than the risk of side effects. Many people using this medication do not have serious side effects.

Tell your doctor right away if you have any serious side effects, including: stretch marks. skin thinning/discoloration, acne. excessive hair growth, hair bumps (folliculitis ).

Rarely, it is possible this medication will be absorbed from the skin into the bloodstream. This can lead to side effects of too much corticosteroid. These side effects are more likely in children, and in people who use this medication for a long time or over large areas of the skin. Tell your doctor right away if any of the following side effects occur: unusual/extreme tiredness, weight loss. headache. swelling ankles /feet, increased thirst/urination, vision problems.

A very serious allergic reaction to this drug is rare. However, get medical help right away if you notice any symptoms of a serious allergic reaction. including: rash. itching/swelling (especially of the face/tongue /throat), severe dizziness. trouble breathing .

This is not a complete list of possible side effects. If you notice other effects not listed above, contact your doctor or pharmacist.

Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088 or at www. fda. gov/medwatch.

In Canada - Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to Health Canada at 1-866-234-2345.

Precautions

Before using fluticasone, tell your doctor or pharmacist if you are allergic to it; or if you have any other allergies. This product may contain inactive ingredients (such as formaldehyde ), which can cause allergic reactions or other problems. Talk to your pharmacist for more details.

Before using this medication, tell your doctor or pharmacist your medical history, especially of: poor blood circulation, diabetes. immune system problems.

Corticosteroids can make skin infections worse and more difficult to treat. Tell your doctor if you have a skin infection or if your condition does not improve.

Rarely, using corticosteroid medications for a long time or over large areas of skin can make it more difficult for your body to respond to physical stress. Therefore, before having surgery or emergency treatment, or if you get a serious illness/injury, tell your doctor or dentist that you are using this medication or have used this medication within the past few months.

Though it is unlikely, this medication may slow down a child's growth if used for a long time. The effect on final adult height is unknown. See the doctor regularly so your child's height can be checked.

During pregnancy. this medication should be used only when clearly needed. Discuss the risks and benefits with your doctor.

It is unknown if this medication passes into breast milk. Consult your doctor before breast - feeding.

Interactions

Drug interactions may change how your medications work or increase your risk for serious side effects. This document does not contain all possible drug interactions. Keep a list of all the products you use (including prescription/nonprescription drugs and herbal products) and share it with your doctor and pharmacist. Do not start, stop, or change the dosage of any medicines without your doctor's approval.

Overdose

This medicine may be harmful if swallowed. If swallowing or overdose is suspected, contact a poison control center or emergency room right away. US residents can call their local poison control center at 1-800-222-1222. Canada residents can call a provincial poison control center.

Notes

Do not share this medication with others.

This medication has been prescribed for your current condition only. Do not use it later for other skin problems unless told to do so by your doctor. A different medication may be necessary in those cases.

Laboratory and/or medical tests (such as adrenal gland function tests) may be performed periodically to monitor your progress or check for side effects, especially if you use this drug for a long time or apply it over large areas of the body. Consult your doctor for more details.

Missed Dose

If you miss a dose, use it as soon as you remember. If it is near the time of the next dose, skip the missed dose and resume your usual dosing schedule. Do not double the dose to catch up.

Storage

Different brands of this medication have different storage needs. Check the product package for instructions on how to store your brand, or ask your pharmacist. Keep all medications away from children and pets.

Do not flush medications down the toilet or pour them into a drain unless instructed to do so. Properly discard this product when it is expired or no longer needed. Consult your pharmacist or local waste disposal company.

Information last revised October 2015. Copyright(c) 2015 First Databank, Inc.

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The Mosquito Patch is a new kind of insect repellent. No more covering your eyes to spray harsh aerosol repellants. The Mosquito Patch is a small, transdermal skin patch that couldn’t be easier to use. Just slap it on and get the most out of your outdoor adventures.

Copyright © 2014 The Mosquito Patch

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Description

About this item

Ingredients.

Natural Thiamins 50 mg, adhesive patch

Directions.

Remove backing slowly & apply one patch to clean, dry, hairless skin every 48 hours. Allow 2 hours before protection is needed against mosquitoes and other biting insects.

Legal Disclaimer.

Actual product packaging and materials may contain more and different information than what is shown on our website. We recommend that you do not rely solely on the information presented and that you always read labels, warnings, and directions before using or consuming a product. Please see our full disclaimer below.

Important Information

Indications

Repel biting insects

Ingredients

Natural Thiamins 50 mg, adhesive patch

Directions

Remove backing slowly & apply one patch to clean, dry, hairless skin every 48 hours. Allow 2 hours before protection is needed against mosquitoes and other biting insects.

Legal Disclaimer

Actual product packaging and materials may contain more and different information than what is shown on our website. We recommend that you do not rely solely on the information presented and that you always read labels, warnings, and directions before using or consuming a product. Please see our full disclaimer below.

Institute for rational pharmacotherapy panodil extended-release tablets, panodil

Panodil extended-release tablets

The new extended-release tablets was a new formulation of this well-known medicinal product Panodil. The new paracetamol tablet contains 665 mg, compared to 500 mg in ordinary tablets. A dosage of two 665 mg tablets three times daily of the new product has been found to be therapeutically equivalent to two 500 mg tablets four times daily. Due to the risk of overdose, the new product is prescription-only, like Panodil Retard and Panodil 1 g.

Panodil new extended-release tablets was marketed on Monday, 1 April.

The advantage of the new extended-release tablets is that the number of daily doses for chronic pain can be reduced from four to three daily. Compared to Panodil Retard, the new product involves a reduction in the number of tablets per dose from four to two, but patients must take it more often: three times daily instead of two.

The disadvantage is that one month?s therapy costs three times as much as ordinary paracetamol tablets or Panodil 1 g. On the other hand, the new Panodil costs a little less than Panodil Retard.

Extended-release tablets (also Panodil Retard) should not be crushed as ordinary tablets can be, since this causes them to lose their time-release capability. Caregivers should be made aware of this fact if the new tablets are prescribed.

The shelf life of extended-release tablets is substantially shorter than that of ordinary tablets (two years in plastic bottles and three years in blister packs), which is yet another reason why the new product should only be used to treat chronic pain.

All in all, Panodil 1 g seems to be the best choice for chronic pain treatment at this time, when both cost and compliance are taken into consideration. On the other hand, there is no generic product which can be substituted for it and thus no competition in the longer term.

Cost, largest pack (DKK)

Chloroquine

chloroquine

GENERIC NAME(S): CHLOROQUINE PHOSPHATE

Uses

Chloroquine is used to prevent or treat malaria caused by mosquito bites in countries where malaria is common. Malaria parasites can enter the body through these mosquito bites. and then live in body tissues such as red blood cells or the liver. This medication is used to kill the malaria parasites living inside red blood cells. In some cases, you may need to take a different medication (such as primaquine ) to kill the malaria parasites living in other body tissues. Both drugs may be needed for a complete cure and to prevent the return of infection (relapse). Chloroquine belongs to a class of drugs known as antimalarials.

The United States Centers for Disease Control provide updated guidelines and travel recommendations for the prevention and treatment of malaria in different parts of the world. Discuss the most recent information with your doctor before traveling to areas where malaria occurs.

Chloroquine is also used to treat infection caused by a different type of parasite (ameba) by killing the ameba.

OTHER USES: This section contains uses of this drug that are not listed in the approved professional labeling for the drug but that may be prescribed by your health care professional. Use this drug for a condition that is listed in this section only if it has been so prescribed by your health care professional.

This drug may also be used to treat certain immune system diseases (such as lupus ).

How to use chloroquine

Take this medication by mouth. usually with food to prevent stomach upset, exactly as directed by your doctor. Daily or weekly dosing, dosage amount, and length of treatment are based on your medical condition, on whether you are preventing or treating the illness, and your response to treatment. The dosage in children is also based on weight .

To prevent malaria, take chloroquine once weekly on the same day each week, or as directed by your doctor. Start this medication usually 1 to 2 weeks before you enter the malarious area, continue to take it weekly while in the area, and weekly for 4 to 8 weeks after leaving the area, or as directed by your doctor. Mark your calendar or travel schedule with a reminder to help you remember.

To treat malaria infection or an ameba infection, follow your doctor's instructions.

Take this medication 4 hours before or after taking a certain drug for diarrhea (kaolin) or taking antacids (such as magnesium /aluminum hydroxide). These products may bind with chloroquine, preventing your body from fully absorbing the drug.

It is very important to continue taking this medication exactly as prescribed by your doctor. Do not take more or less of this drug than prescribed. Do not stop taking it before completing treatment, even if you feel better, unless directed to do so by your doctor. Skipping or changing your dose without approval from your doctor may cause prevention/treatment to be ineffective, cause the amount of parasite to increase, make the infection more difficult to treat (resistant), or worsen side effects.

It is important to prevent mosquito bites (such as by using appropriate insect repellents, wearing clothes that cover most of the body, remaining in air-conditioned or well-screened areas, using mosquito nets and insect-killing spray). Buy insect repellent before traveling. The most effective insect repellents contain diethyltoluamide (DEET). Ask your doctor or pharmacist to recommend the appropriate strengths of mosquito repellent for you/your children.

No drug treatment is completely effective in preventing malaria. Therefore, seek immediate medical attention if you develop symptoms of malaria (such as fever, chills, headache. other flu - like symptoms), especially while in the malarious area and for 2 months after completing this prescription. Quick treatment of malaria infection is needed to prevent serious, possibly fatal, outcomes.

When using chloroquine for treatment of malaria, tell your doctor if your condition persists or worsens.

Side Effects

Blurred vision. nausea. vomiting. abdominal cramps. headache. and diarrhea may occur. If any of these effects persist or worsen, tell your doctor or pharmacist promptly.

Remember that your doctor has prescribed this medication because he or she has judged that the benefit to you is greater than the risk of side effects. Many people using this medication do not have serious side effects.

Tell your doctor right away if you have any serious side effects, including: bleaching of hair color, hair loss. mental/mood changes (such as confusion, personality changes, unusual thoughts/behavior, depression ), hearing changes (such as ringing in the ears. hearing loss ), darkening of skin /tissue inside the mouth. worsening of skin conditions (such as dermatitis. psoriasis ), sun sensitivity, signs of serious infection (such as high fever. severe chills, persistent sore throat ), unusual tiredness, swelling legs/ankles. shortness of breath, pale lips/nails/skin, signs of liver disease (such as severe stomach /abdominal pain. yellowing eyes /skin, dark urine), easy bruising/bleeding, muscle weakness. unwanted/uncontrolled movements (including tongue and face twitching ).

Get medical help right away if you have any very serious side effects, including: severe dizziness. fainting. fast/slow/irregular heartbeat. seizures .

This medication may cause serious eye/vision problems. The risk for these side effects is increased with long-term use of this medication (over weeks to years) and with taking this medication in high doses. Get medical help right away if you have any symptoms of serious eye problems. including: severe vision changes (such as light flashes/streaks, difficulty reading, complete blindness).

A very serious allergic reaction to this drug is rare. However, get medical help right away if you notice any symptoms of a serious allergic reaction, including: rash, itching/swelling (especially of the face/tongue/throat), severe dizziness, trouble breathing.

This is not a complete list of possible side effects. If you notice other effects not listed above, contact your doctor or pharmacist.

Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088 or at www. fda. gov/medwatch.

In Canada - Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to Health Canada at 1-866-234-2345.

Precautions

Before taking chloroquine, tell your doctor or pharmacist if you are allergic to it; or to hydroxychloroquine; or if you have any other allergies. This product may contain inactive ingredients, which can cause allergic reactions or other problems. Talk to your pharmacist for more details.

Before using this medication, tell your doctor or pharmacist your medical history, especially of: a certain enzyme problem (glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency-G6PD), vision/eye problems, hearing problems, kidney disease, liver disease, regular alcohol use/abuse, psoriasis, a certain blood disorder (porphyria), seizures.

This drug may cause blurred vision or rarely make you dizzy. Do not drive, use machinery, or do any activity that requires alertness or clear vision until you are sure you can perform such activities safely. Avoid alcoholic beverages.

Before having surgery, tell your doctor or dentist about all the products you use (including prescription drugs, nonprescription drugs, and herbal products).

This medication may make you more sensitive to the sun. Avoid prolonged sun exposure, tanning booths, and sunlamps. Use a sunscreen and wear protective clothing when outdoors.

Chloroquine may cause a condition that affects the heart rhythm (QT prolongation). QT prolongation can rarely cause serious (rarely fatal) fast/irregular heartbeat and other symptoms (such as severe dizziness, fainting) that need medical attention right away.

The risk of QT prolongation may be increased if you have certain medical conditions or are taking other drugs that may cause QT prolongation. Before using chloroquine, tell your doctor or pharmacist of all the drugs you take and if you have any of the following conditions: certain heart problems (heart failure, slow heartbeat, QT prolongation in the EKG), family history of certain heart problems (QT prolongation in the EKG, sudden cardiac death).

Low levels of potassium or magnesium in the blood may also increase your risk of QT prolongation. This risk may increase if you use certain drugs (such as diuretics/"water pills") or if you have conditions such as severe sweating, diarrhea, or vomiting. Talk to your doctor about using chloroquine safely.

Older adults may be more sensitive to the side effects of this drug, especially eye/vision problems and QT prolongation (see above).

During pregnancy, this medication should be used only when clearly needed. It may harm an unborn baby. While you are pregnant, traveling to an area with malaria places you and your infant at much higher risk of death and other problems. Discuss the risks and benefits of malaria prevention with your doctor.

This drug passes into breast milk and the effect on a nursing infant is unknown. Discuss the risks and benefits with your doctor before breast-feeding.

Interactions

See also How to Use section.

Drug interactions may change how your medications work or increase your risk for serious side effects. This document does not contain all possible drug interactions. Keep a list of all the products you use (including prescription/nonprescription drugs and herbal products) and share it with your doctor and pharmacist. Do not start, stop, or change the dosage of any medicines without your doctor's approval.

Some products that may interact with this drug include: agalsidase, mefloquine, penicillamine, sulfadoxine/pyrimethamine, products that may harm the liver (such as acetaminophen, isoniazid, alcohol).

This medication can speed up or slow down the removal of other medications from your body, which may affect how they work. Examples of affected drugs include cyclosporine, praziquantel, among others.

Many drugs besides chloroquine may affect the heart rhythm (QT prolongation), including amiodarone, dofetilide, mefloquine, pimozide, procainamide, quinidine, sotalol, macrolide antibiotics (such as erythromycin), among others. Therefore, before using chloroquine, report all medications you are currently using to your doctor or pharmacist.

Cimetidine is a nonprescription drug that is commonly used to treat extra stomach acid. Because cimetidine and other antacids may interact with chloroquine, ask your pharmacist about other products to treat extra stomach acid.

Take chloroquine at least 2 hours before or after taking ampicillin. Chloroquine may decrease the amount of ampicillin in your body and the ampicillin may not work as well.

Although no longer available in the United States, a certain rabies vaccine (HDCV) may not work as well if given while you are taking chloroquine.

Overdose

If overdose is suspected, contact a poison control center or emergency room right away. US residents can call their local poison control center at 1-800-222-1222. Canada residents can call a provincial poison control center. Symptoms of overdose may include: fast/irregular heartbeat, fainting, slow/shallow breathing, unwanted/uncontrolled movements (including tongue and face twitching), seizures, inability to wake up (coma).

Notes

Do not share this medication with others.

Laboratory and/or medical tests (such as eye exams, reflex tests, liver tests, EKG, complete blood counts) should be performed periodically to monitor your progress or check for side effects if you are taking chloroquine for long periods. Consult your doctor for more details.

Missed Dose

If you miss a dose, take it as soon as you remember. If it is near the time of the next dose, skip the missed dose and resume your usual dosing schedule. Do not double the dose to catch up.

Storage

Store at room temperature away from light and moisture. Do not store in the bathroom. Keep all medications away from children and pets.

Do not flush medications down the toilet or pour them into a drain unless instructed to do so. Properly discard this product when it is expired or no longer needed. Consult your pharmacist or local waste disposal company.

Information last revised October 2015. Copyright(c) 2015 First Databank, Inc.

Images

Chloroquine tablets and liquid medicine (Avloclor, Malarivon)

Tablets and liquid medicine

Chloroquine is mainly used to protect against malaria when people travel to areas where this can be a problem. It is usually used in combination with another antimalarial medicine to increase its effectiveness. It is also used to treat people who have a form of malaria called non-falciparum malaria.

Malaria is a serious infection. It is common in tropical countries such as parts of Africa, Asia, South and Central America, and the Middle East. Malaria is a disease which is passed on to humans by infected mosquitoes. A parasite called plasmodium lives inside the stomachs of infected female mosquitoes and is passed on to humans by a bite.

Because the pattern of malaria varies with the part of the world you are travelling to, as well as the season and the type of activity you have planned, you should always obtain the latest advice about malaria prevention from your doctor, pharmacist or travel organiser. A backpacking trip may well require different preventative measures against malaria to those needed for a business trip to a city.

Chloroquine is not prescribable on the NHS in order to prevent malaria, but you are able to buy the tablets at pharmacies, without a prescription, for this purpose.

Chloroquine is available on prescription to treat rheumatoid arthritis and lupus erythematosus. although other treatments are usually preferred. These are both autoimmune diseases. This means that your immune system (which normally protects your body from infections) mistakenly attacks itself. This causes pain and damage to parts of your body. Chloroquine is used in some people to help reduce the damage these conditions can cause.

Related discussions

Worms in the Face

Before taking chloroquine

Some medicines are not suitable for people with certain conditions, and sometimes a medicine can only be used if extra care is taken. For these reasons, before you start taking chloroquine it is important that your doctor or pharmacist knows:

If you are pregnant or breast-feeding. Travel to areas with malaria is best avoided during pregnancy. If the travel is unavoidable, you will be advised to take chloroquine even if you are pregnant.

If you have any problems with the way your kidneys work, or any problems with the way your liver works.

If you have ever had epilepsy.

If you have a skin condition called psoriasis.

If you have a condition which causes severe muscle weakness, called myasthenia gravis.

If you have problems with your stomach or intestines.

If you have either of these rare inherited conditions: a blood disorder called porphyria, or glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency (this is a disorder which causes problems after eating some foods, such as fava beans).

If you are taking any other medicines. This includes any medicines which are available to buy without a prescription, as well as herbal and complementary medicines.

If you have ever had an allergic reaction to a medicine.

How to take chloroquine

Before you take chloroquine, read the manufacturer's printed information leaflet from inside the pack. It will give you more information about the medicine, and will also provide you with a full list of the side-effects which you could experience from taking it.

It is important that you take chloroquine exactly as you have been directed. Your doctor or pharmacist will tell you how much to take, and how often to take it. The directions will also be printed on the label of the pack to remind you about what was said to you. Chloroquine should be taken with food. Swallow the tablets with a drink of water.

If you take a medicine for indigestion (such as an antacid), do not take it within two hours, either before or after, of taking chloroquine. This is because antacids interfere with the way chloroquine is absorbed by your body, making it less effective.

If you have been advised to have an oral vaccine to protect you against typhoid, you should arrange to have this so your course is finished at least three days before you start taking chloroquine. This is because chloroquine can stop the vaccine from working properly.

If you suspect that you have taken an overdose of chloroquine, or that someone else (especially if it is a child) might have taken it accidentally, go to the accident and emergency department of a local hospital straightaway . This is very important because chloroquine can cause serious problems when it is taken accidentally or in overdose. Take the container with you to show what has been taken, even if the pack is now empty.

If you are taking chloroquine to protect against malaria

You should take the first dose of chloroquine a week before entering an area where malaria occurs. This is to ensure there is sufficient medicine in your bloodstream to give you the required protection. You should continue to take chloroquine throughout your stay and for a further four weeks after you have left the area.

Take the tablets (or medicine) exactly as your doctor or pharmacist has told you. The dose for an adult is two tablets once a week . on the same day of the week. If the chloroquine is for a child, read the directions on the label carefully, as their dose will depend upon their age and weight.

If you forget to take a dose on the correct day, take it as soon as you remember and then wait seven days before you take your next dose.

You should complete the full course of tablets (or medicine). This means making sure that you remember to take chloroquine for four weeks after your visit is over.

Chloroquine will help reduce the risk of you getting malaria, but it is also important that you take the following precautions against being bitten by mosquitoes:

Cover up bare areas of your arms and legs with long-sleeved, loose-fitting clothing, long trousers and socks. This is especially important if you are outside after sunset, as this is when mosquitoes feed.

Use an effective insect repellant spray on your clothing and any area of your skin which is bare. If you are also using a sunscreen, apply the sunscreen first and the insect repellant afterwards.

Spray the room with an insecticide each evening a couple of hours before you go to bed. Check your sleeping areas for mosquitoes - pay particular attention to furniture and areas under your bed where insects can hide.

If you are sleeping in an unscreened room, use a mosquito net impregnated with an insecticide.

If you feel ill or develop a high temperature (fever) or flu-like symptoms while you are travelling or within one year (especially if it is within three months) of returning home, you should see your doctor straightaway. This is important, even if you have taken your antimalarial tablets correctly.

If you are taking chloroquine for rheumatoid arthritis or lupus erythematosus

It is usual to take chloroquine once daily, although some people could be advised to take it twice daily for a short period of time. Your dose will be adjusted to suit you, so it is important that you follow the directions given to you by your doctor or specialist; for most people the dose is likely to be one tablet a day. The directions will be printed on the label of the pack to remind you about what the doctor said to you.

Try to keep your regular appointments with your doctor. This is so your doctor can check on your progress. Your doctor is likely to check your vision before you start the treatment, and then regularly thereafter. This is because chloroquine can affect your eyesight when taken over a long period of time. If you notice any changes in your vision, you should inform your doctor as soon as possible so that it can be checked.

If you forget to take a dose, take it as soon as you remember. If you do not remember until the following day, leave out the forgotten dose from the previous day and take the dose that is due as normal. Do not take two doses on the same day to make up for a missed dose.

Can chloroquine cause problems?

All medicines can cause unwanted side-effects along with their useful effects, although not everyone experiences them. The unwanted effects usually improve as your body adjusts to the new medicine. When chloroquine is used to prevent malaria, side-effects are generally uncommon and not serious. Where chloroquine is taken for a long time, side-effects can be more serious. Speak with your doctor or pharmacist if any of the following continue or become troublesome:

What can I do if I experience this?

Chloroquine

Chloroquine is the generic form of the brand-name prescription medicine Aralen, which is used to prevent and treat malaria — a mosquito-borne disease caused by a parasite — and to treat amebiasis, an infection of the intestines caused by a parasite.

This medicine is also sometimes given off-label to help the following conditions:

Rheumatoid arthritis

Arthritis in children

Lupus (an autoimmune disease characterized by inflammation and a variety of symptoms)

Skin conditions

Sarcoidosis (a condition characterized by the growth of inflammatory cells in the body)

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) first approved chloroquine in 1949. It's marketed as Aralen by Sanofi Aventis.

Chloroquine Warnings

Before taking chloroquine, tell your doctor if you have, or have ever had:

Liver disease

Hearing problems

Psoriasis

Eye or vision problems

Weakness in your knees and ankles

G6PD deficiency (a genetic disorder)

Porphyria (a blood disorder)

Seizures

Stomach or intestinal problems

Kidney disease

Allergies to medicines

Also, let your doctor know if you drink large amounts of alcohol before starting on this medicine.

Your doctor will probably want to order frequent tests to check your body's response to chloroquine. Keep all appointments with your doctor and laboratory.

Let your healthcare provider know if your symptoms either don't improve or worsen while taking this medicine.

Chloroquine may make your skin more sensitive to the sun. Avoid unnecessary sun exposure and tanning booths and wear sunscreen and protective clothing when outdoors.

Don't receive any vaccination (especially a rabies vaccine) while using chloroquine without first discussing it with your doctor.

Pregnancy and Chloroquine

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), chloroquine is considered safe to use during pregnancy.

Tell your doctor if you're pregnant or might become pregnant while taking chloroquine. You'll have to discuss the risks and benefits of using this medicine during pregnancy.

Chloroquine passes into breast milk and may harm a breastfeeding baby. Don't breastfeed while taking this drug without first talking to your healthcare provider.

Chloroquine comes as a tablet, liquid, or injection.

Your dose will depend on your medical condition, age, weight, and response to treatment.

You can take this medicine with food if it causes an upset stomach.

Injections of chloroquine are usually given at your doctor's office, a hospital, or another clinic setting. But you may also be shown how to inject the medicine at home.

Follow the instructions on your prescription label carefully. Don't take more or less chloroquine than is recommended.

Malaria prevention (oral): If you're taking oral chloroquine for the prevention of malaria, it's typically taken once a week on the same day of each week.

Your first dose is usually taken two weeks before you travel to an area where malaria is common.

Then, you'll continue to take the medicine while you're in the area and for about eight weeks after you return home.

Malaria treatment (oral): To treat malaria in adults, one dose of oral chloroquine is usually given right away.

Then, half the dose is taken six to eight hours later.

This is typically followed by half the dose once a day for the next two days.

Amebiasis treatment (oral): To treat amebiasis in adults, one oral dose of chloroquine is usually taken for two days.

Then, half the dose is given every day for two to three weeks.

Ask your doctor about what chloroquine dose to take to treat rheumatoid arthritis. lupus, or sarcoidosis.

Chloroquine Overdose

Symptoms of a chloroquine overdose may include:

Drowsiness

Dizziness

Blurred vision

Fainting

Headache

Excessive excitability

Mood changes

Seizures

Irregular heartbeat

Slow, shallow breathing

Loss of consciousness

If you suspect an overdose, contact a poison control center or emergency room immediately.

You can get in touch with a poison control center at 800-222-1222.

Missed Dose of Chloroquine

If you miss a dose of chloroquine, take it as soon as you remember.

But if it's almost time for your next scheduled dose, skip the missed dose and continue with your regular medication schedule.

Don't double up on doses to make up for a missed one.

Chloroquine Phosphate Oral

Chloroquine phosphate comes as a tablet to take by mouth. For prevention of malaria in adults, one dose is usually taken once a week on exactly the same day of the week. Your doctor will tell you how many tablets to take for each dose. One dose is taken beginning 2 weeks before traveling to an area where malaria is common, while you are in the area, and then for 8 weeks after you return from the area. If you are unable to start 2 weeks before traveling, your doctor may tell you to take double the dose right away.

For treatment of acute attacks of malaria in adults, one dose is usually taken right away, followed by half the dose 6 to 8 hours later and then half the dose once a day for the next 2 days.

For prevention and treatment of malaria in infants and children, the amount of chloroquine phosphate is based on the child's weight. Your doctor will calculate this amount and tell you how much chloroquine phosphate your child should receive.

For treatment of amebiasis, one dose is usually taken for 2 days and then half the dose every day for 2 to 3 weeks. It is usually taken in combination with other amebicides.

Chloroquine phosphate may cause an upset stomach. Take chloroquine phosphate with food.

Follow the directions on your prescription label carefully, and ask your doctor or pharmacist to explain any part you do not understand. Use chloroquine phosphate exactly as directed. Do not use more or less of it or use it more often than prescribed by your doctor.

Other uses for this medicine

Chloroquine phosphate is used occasionally to decrease the symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis and to treat systemic and discoid lupus erythematosus, scleroderma, pemphigus, lichen planus, polymyositis, sarcoidosis, and porphyria cutanea tarda. Talk to your doctor about the possible risks of using this drug for your condition.

What special precautions should I follow?

Before using chloroquine phosphate,

tell your doctor and pharmacist if you are allergic to chloroquine phosphate, chloroquine hydrochloride (Aralen HCl), hydroxychloroquine (Plaquenil), or any other drugs.

tell your doctor and pharmacist what prescription and nonprescription medications you are taking, especially acetaminophen (Tylenol, others), cimetidine (Tagamet), iron products, isoniazid (Nydrazid), kaolin, magnesium trisilicate (Gaviscon), methotrexate (Rheumatrex), niacin, rifampin (Rifadin, Rimactane), and vitamins and herbal products.

tell your doctor if you have or have ever had liver disease, G-6-PD deficiency, hearing problems, porphyria or other blood disorders, psoriasis, vision changes, weakness in your knees and ankles, or if you drink large amounts of alcohol.

tell your doctor if you have ever had vision changes while taking chloroquine phosphate, chloroquine hydrochloride (Aralen HCl), or hydroxychloroquine (Plaquenil).

tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant. If you become pregnant while using chloroquine phosphate, call your doctor.

tell your doctor if you are breast-feeding or plan to breast-feed. Chloroquine phosphate can harm a nursing infant.

What special dietary instructions should I follow?

Chloroquine

Chloroquine is the generic form of the brand-name prescription medicine Aralen, which is used to prevent and treat malaria — a mosquito-borne disease caused by a parasite — and to treat amebiasis, an infection of the intestines caused by a parasite.

This medicine is also sometimes given off-label to help the following conditions:

Rheumatoid arthritis

Arthritis in children

Lupus (an autoimmune disease characterized by inflammation and a variety of symptoms)

Skin conditions

Sarcoidosis (a condition characterized by the growth of inflammatory cells in the body)

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) first approved chloroquine in 1949. It's marketed as Aralen by Sanofi Aventis.

Chloroquine Warnings

Before taking chloroquine, tell your doctor if you have, or have ever had:

Liver disease

Hearing problems

Psoriasis

Eye or vision problems

Weakness in your knees and ankles

G6PD deficiency (a genetic disorder)

Porphyria (a blood disorder)

Seizures

Stomach or intestinal problems

Kidney disease

Allergies to medicines

Also, let your doctor know if you drink large amounts of alcohol before starting on this medicine.

Your doctor will probably want to order frequent tests to check your body's response to chloroquine. Keep all appointments with your doctor and laboratory.

Let your healthcare provider know if your symptoms either don't improve or worsen while taking this medicine.

Chloroquine may make your skin more sensitive to the sun. Avoid unnecessary sun exposure and tanning booths and wear sunscreen and protective clothing when outdoors.

Don't receive any vaccination (especially a rabies vaccine) while using chloroquine without first discussing it with your doctor.

Pregnancy and Chloroquine

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), chloroquine is considered safe to use during pregnancy.

Tell your doctor if you're pregnant or might become pregnant while taking chloroquine. You'll have to discuss the risks and benefits of using this medicine during pregnancy.

Chloroquine passes into breast milk and may harm a breastfeeding baby. Don't breastfeed while taking this drug without first talking to your healthcare provider.

Chloroquine comes as a tablet, liquid, or injection.

Your dose will depend on your medical condition, age, weight, and response to treatment.

You can take this medicine with food if it causes an upset stomach.

Injections of chloroquine are usually given at your doctor's office, a hospital, or another clinic setting. But you may also be shown how to inject the medicine at home.

Follow the instructions on your prescription label carefully. Don't take more or less chloroquine than is recommended.

Malaria prevention (oral): If you're taking oral chloroquine for the prevention of malaria, it's typically taken once a week on the same day of each week.

Your first dose is usually taken two weeks before you travel to an area where malaria is common.

Then, you'll continue to take the medicine while you're in the area and for about eight weeks after you return home.

Malaria treatment (oral): To treat malaria in adults, one dose of oral chloroquine is usually given right away.

Then, half the dose is taken six to eight hours later.

This is typically followed by half the dose once a day for the next two days.

Amebiasis treatment (oral): To treat amebiasis in adults, one oral dose of chloroquine is usually taken for two days.

Then, half the dose is given every day for two to three weeks.

Ask your doctor about what chloroquine dose to take to treat rheumatoid arthritis. lupus, or sarcoidosis.

Chloroquine Overdose

Symptoms of a chloroquine overdose may include:

Drowsiness

Dizziness

Blurred vision

Fainting

Headache

Excessive excitability

Mood changes

Seizures

Irregular heartbeat

Slow, shallow breathing

Loss of consciousness

If you suspect an overdose, contact a poison control center or emergency room immediately.

You can get in touch with a poison control center at 800-222-1222.

Missed Dose of Chloroquine

If you miss a dose of chloroquine, take it as soon as you remember.

But if it's almost time for your next scheduled dose, skip the missed dose and continue with your regular medication schedule.

Don't double up on doses to make up for a missed one.

chloroquine

GENERIC NAME(S): CHLOROQUINE PHOSPHATE

Uses

Chloroquine is used to prevent or treat malaria caused by mosquito bites in countries where malaria is common. Malaria parasites can enter the body through these mosquito bites. and then live in body tissues such as red blood cells or the liver. This medication is used to kill the malaria parasites living inside red blood cells. In some cases, you may need to take a different medication (such as primaquine ) to kill the malaria parasites living in other body tissues. Both drugs may be needed for a complete cure and to prevent the return of infection (relapse). Chloroquine belongs to a class of drugs known as antimalarials.

The United States Centers for Disease Control provide updated guidelines and travel recommendations for the prevention and treatment of malaria in different parts of the world. Discuss the most recent information with your doctor before traveling to areas where malaria occurs.

Chloroquine is also used to treat infection caused by a different type of parasite (ameba) by killing the ameba.

OTHER USES: This section contains uses of this drug that are not listed in the approved professional labeling for the drug but that may be prescribed by your health care professional. Use this drug for a condition that is listed in this section only if it has been so prescribed by your health care professional.

This drug may also be used to treat certain immune system diseases (such as lupus ).

How to use chloroquine

Take this medication by mouth. usually with food to prevent stomach upset, exactly as directed by your doctor. Daily or weekly dosing, dosage amount, and length of treatment are based on your medical condition, on whether you are preventing or treating the illness, and your response to treatment. The dosage in children is also based on weight .

To prevent malaria, take chloroquine once weekly on the same day each week, or as directed by your doctor. Start this medication usually 1 to 2 weeks before you enter the malarious area, continue to take it weekly while in the area, and weekly for 4 to 8 weeks after leaving the area, or as directed by your doctor. Mark your calendar or travel schedule with a reminder to help you remember.

To treat malaria infection or an ameba infection, follow your doctor's instructions.

Take this medication 4 hours before or after taking a certain drug for diarrhea (kaolin) or taking antacids (such as magnesium /aluminum hydroxide). These products may bind with chloroquine, preventing your body from fully absorbing the drug.

It is very important to continue taking this medication exactly as prescribed by your doctor. Do not take more or less of this drug than prescribed. Do not stop taking it before completing treatment, even if you feel better, unless directed to do so by your doctor. Skipping or changing your dose without approval from your doctor may cause prevention/treatment to be ineffective, cause the amount of parasite to increase, make the infection more difficult to treat (resistant), or worsen side effects.

It is important to prevent mosquito bites (such as by using appropriate insect repellents, wearing clothes that cover most of the body, remaining in air-conditioned or well-screened areas, using mosquito nets and insect-killing spray). Buy insect repellent before traveling. The most effective insect repellents contain diethyltoluamide (DEET). Ask your doctor or pharmacist to recommend the appropriate strengths of mosquito repellent for you/your children.

No drug treatment is completely effective in preventing malaria. Therefore, seek immediate medical attention if you develop symptoms of malaria (such as fever, chills, headache. other flu - like symptoms), especially while in the malarious area and for 2 months after completing this prescription. Quick treatment of malaria infection is needed to prevent serious, possibly fatal, outcomes.

When using chloroquine for treatment of malaria, tell your doctor if your condition persists or worsens.

Side Effects

Blurred vision. nausea. vomiting. abdominal cramps. headache. and diarrhea may occur. If any of these effects persist or worsen, tell your doctor or pharmacist promptly.

Remember that your doctor has prescribed this medication because he or she has judged that the benefit to you is greater than the risk of side effects. Many people using this medication do not have serious side effects.

Tell your doctor right away if you have any serious side effects, including: bleaching of hair color, hair loss. mental/mood changes (such as confusion, personality changes, unusual thoughts/behavior, depression ), hearing changes (such as ringing in the ears. hearing loss ), darkening of skin /tissue inside the mouth. worsening of skin conditions (such as dermatitis. psoriasis ), sun sensitivity, signs of serious infection (such as high fever. severe chills, persistent sore throat ), unusual tiredness, swelling legs/ankles. shortness of breath, pale lips/nails/skin, signs of liver disease (such as severe stomach /abdominal pain. yellowing eyes /skin, dark urine), easy bruising/bleeding, muscle weakness. unwanted/uncontrolled movements (including tongue and face twitching ).

Get medical help right away if you have any very serious side effects, including: severe dizziness. fainting. fast/slow/irregular heartbeat. seizures .

This medication may cause serious eye/vision problems. The risk for these side effects is increased with long-term use of this medication (over weeks to years) and with taking this medication in high doses. Get medical help right away if you have any symptoms of serious eye problems. including: severe vision changes (such as light flashes/streaks, difficulty reading, complete blindness).

A very serious allergic reaction to this drug is rare. However, get medical help right away if you notice any symptoms of a serious allergic reaction, including: rash, itching/swelling (especially of the face/tongue/throat), severe dizziness, trouble breathing.

This is not a complete list of possible side effects. If you notice other effects not listed above, contact your doctor or pharmacist.

Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088 or at www. fda. gov/medwatch.

In Canada - Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to Health Canada at 1-866-234-2345.

Precautions

Before taking chloroquine, tell your doctor or pharmacist if you are allergic to it; or to hydroxychloroquine; or if you have any other allergies. This product may contain inactive ingredients, which can cause allergic reactions or other problems. Talk to your pharmacist for more details.

Before using this medication, tell your doctor or pharmacist your medical history, especially of: a certain enzyme problem (glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency-G6PD), vision/eye problems, hearing problems, kidney disease, liver disease, regular alcohol use/abuse, psoriasis, a certain blood disorder (porphyria), seizures.

This drug may cause blurred vision or rarely make you dizzy. Do not drive, use machinery, or do any activity that requires alertness or clear vision until you are sure you can perform such activities safely. Avoid alcoholic beverages.

Before having surgery, tell your doctor or dentist about all the products you use (including prescription drugs, nonprescription drugs, and herbal products).

This medication may make you more sensitive to the sun. Avoid prolonged sun exposure, tanning booths, and sunlamps. Use a sunscreen and wear protective clothing when outdoors.

Chloroquine may cause a condition that affects the heart rhythm (QT prolongation). QT prolongation can rarely cause serious (rarely fatal) fast/irregular heartbeat and other symptoms (such as severe dizziness, fainting) that need medical attention right away.

The risk of QT prolongation may be increased if you have certain medical conditions or are taking other drugs that may cause QT prolongation. Before using chloroquine, tell your doctor or pharmacist of all the drugs you take and if you have any of the following conditions: certain heart problems (heart failure, slow heartbeat, QT prolongation in the EKG), family history of certain heart problems (QT prolongation in the EKG, sudden cardiac death).

Low levels of potassium or magnesium in the blood may also increase your risk of QT prolongation. This risk may increase if you use certain drugs (such as diuretics/"water pills") or if you have conditions such as severe sweating, diarrhea, or vomiting. Talk to your doctor about using chloroquine safely.

Older adults may be more sensitive to the side effects of this drug, especially eye/vision problems and QT prolongation (see above).

During pregnancy, this medication should be used only when clearly needed. It may harm an unborn baby. While you are pregnant, traveling to an area with malaria places you and your infant at much higher risk of death and other problems. Discuss the risks and benefits of malaria prevention with your doctor.

This drug passes into breast milk and the effect on a nursing infant is unknown. Discuss the risks and benefits with your doctor before breast-feeding.

Interactions

See also How to Use section.

Drug interactions may change how your medications work or increase your risk for serious side effects. This document does not contain all possible drug interactions. Keep a list of all the products you use (including prescription/nonprescription drugs and herbal products) and share it with your doctor and pharmacist. Do not start, stop, or change the dosage of any medicines without your doctor's approval.

Some products that may interact with this drug include: agalsidase, mefloquine, penicillamine, sulfadoxine/pyrimethamine, products that may harm the liver (such as acetaminophen, isoniazid, alcohol).

This medication can speed up or slow down the removal of other medications from your body, which may affect how they work. Examples of affected drugs include cyclosporine, praziquantel, among others.

Many drugs besides chloroquine may affect the heart rhythm (QT prolongation), including amiodarone, dofetilide, mefloquine, pimozide, procainamide, quinidine, sotalol, macrolide antibiotics (such as erythromycin), among others. Therefore, before using chloroquine, report all medications you are currently using to your doctor or pharmacist.

Cimetidine is a nonprescription drug that is commonly used to treat extra stomach acid. Because cimetidine and other antacids may interact with chloroquine, ask your pharmacist about other products to treat extra stomach acid.

Take chloroquine at least 2 hours before or after taking ampicillin. Chloroquine may decrease the amount of ampicillin in your body and the ampicillin may not work as well.

Although no longer available in the United States, a certain rabies vaccine (HDCV) may not work as well if given while you are taking chloroquine.

Overdose

If overdose is suspected, contact a poison control center or emergency room right away. US residents can call their local poison control center at 1-800-222-1222. Canada residents can call a provincial poison control center. Symptoms of overdose may include: fast/irregular heartbeat, fainting, slow/shallow breathing, unwanted/uncontrolled movements (including tongue and face twitching), seizures, inability to wake up (coma).

Notes

Do not share this medication with others.

Laboratory and/or medical tests (such as eye exams, reflex tests, liver tests, EKG, complete blood counts) should be performed periodically to monitor your progress or check for side effects if you are taking chloroquine for long periods. Consult your doctor for more details.

Missed Dose

If you miss a dose, take it as soon as you remember. If it is near the time of the next dose, skip the missed dose and resume your usual dosing schedule. Do not double the dose to catch up.

Storage

Store at room temperature away from light and moisture. Do not store in the bathroom. Keep all medications away from children and pets.

Do not flush medications down the toilet or pour them into a drain unless instructed to do so. Properly discard this product when it is expired or no longer needed. Consult your pharmacist or local waste disposal company.

Information last revised October 2015. Copyright(c) 2015 First Databank, Inc.

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Buy gynogen

Estradiol

What is estradiol?

Estradiol is a form of estrogen, a female sex hormone produced by the ovaries. Estrogen is necessary for many processes in the body.

Estradiol is used to treat symptoms of menopause such as hot flashes, and vaginal dryness, burning, and irritation. Other uses include prevention of osteoporosis in postmenopausal women, and replacement of estrogen in women with ovarian failure or other conditions that cause a lack of natural estrogen in the body.

Estradiol is sometimes used as part of cancer treatment in women and men.

Estradiol may also be used for other purposes not listed in this medication guide.

Important information

You should not use estradiol if you have: liver disease, a bleeding disorder, unusual vaginal bleeding, history of a hormone-dependent cancer (such as breast, uterine, ovarian, or thyroid cancer), or if you have ever had a heart attack, stroke, or a blood clot.

Do not use if you are pregnant.

Estradiol may increase your risk of developing a condition that may lead to uterine cancer. Call your doctor at once if you have any unusual vaginal bleeding while using this medicine.

Estradiol should not be used to prevent heart disease, stroke, or dementia, because this medicine may actually increase your risk of developing these conditions. Long-term use may also increase your risk of breast cancer or blood clot.

Estradiol can harm an unborn baby or cause birth defects. Do not use estradiol if you are pregnant. You should not take estradiol if you have abnormal vaginal bleeding, liver disease, breast or uterine cancer, hormone-dependent cancer, a recent history of heart attack or stroke, if you are pregnant, if you have ever had a blood clot (especially in your lung or your lower body), or if you are allergic to any medicines or food dyes. Taking hormones can increase your risk of blood clots, stroke, or heart attack, especially if you have diabetes, high blood pressure, high cholesterol or triglycerides, if you smoke, or if you are overweight.

Have regular physical exams and mammograms, and self-examine your breasts for lumps on a monthly basis while using estradiol.

Before taking this medicine

You should not use this medicine if you are allergic to estradiol, if you are pregnant, or if you have:

unusual vaginal bleeding that a doctor has not checked;

a bleeding or blood-clotting disorder;

a recent history of heart attack or stroke;

a history of hormone-dependent cancer (such as breast, uterine, ovarian, or thyroid cancer);

if you have ever had a blood clot (especially in your lung or your lower body); or

if you are allergic to any medicines or food dyes.

Estradiol should not be used to prevent heart disease, stroke, or dementia, because this medicine may actually increase your risk of developing these conditions.

To make sure estradiol is safe for you, tell your doctor if you have:

risk factors for coronary artery disease (such as diabetes, lupus, smoking, being overweight, having high blood pressure or high cholesterol, having a family history of coronary artery disease);

a history of jaundice caused by pregnancy or birth control pills;

a thyroid disorder;

epilepsy or other seizure disorder;

porphyria (a genetic enzyme disorder that causes symptoms affecting the skin or nervous system);

endometriosis or uterine fibroid tumors;

high or low levels of calcium in your blood; or

if you have had your uterus removed (hysterectomy).

Long-term use of estradiol may increase your risk of breast cancer, heart attack, stroke, or blood clot. Talk with your doctor about your individual risks before using estradiol long term.

Do not use estradiol if you are pregnant. Tell your doctor right away if you become pregnant during treatment. Use effective birth control while you are using this medicine.

Estradiol can pass into breast milk. This medication may slow breast milk production. Tell your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby.

How should I take estradiol?

Take estradiol exactly as it was prescribed for you. Follow all directions on your prescription label. Do not take this medicine in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended.

Estradiol may increase your risk of developing a condition that may lead to uterine cancer. Your doctor may prescribe a progestin to take while you are using estradiol, to help lower this risk. Report any unusual vaginal bleeding right away.

Your doctor should check your progress on a regular basis (every 3 to 6 months) to determine whether you should continue this treatment. Self-examine your breasts for lumps on a monthly basis, and have regular mammograms while using estradiol.

If you need surgery or medical tests or if you will be on bed rest, you may need to stop using this medicine for a short time. Any doctor or surgeon who treats you should know that you are using estradiol.

Store at room temperature away from moisture, heat, and light. Keep the bottle tightly closed when not in use.

What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. Skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next scheduled dose. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose?

Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222. Overdose can cause nausea, vomiting, or vaginal bleeding.

What should I avoid while using estradiol?

Grapefruit and grapefruit juice may interact with estradiol and lead to unwanted side effects. Discuss the use of grapefruit products with your doctor.

Estradiol side effects

Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction to estradiol: hives; difficult breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Call your doctor at once if you have:

heart attack symptoms - chest pain or pressure, pain spreading to your jaw or shoulder, nausea, sweating;

signs of a stroke - sudden numbness or weakness (especially on one side of the body), sudden severe headache, slurred speech, problems with vision or balance;

signs of a blood clot in the lung - chest pain, sudden cough, wheezing, rapid breathing, coughing up blood;

signs of a blood clot in your leg - pain, swelling, warmth, or redness in one or both legs;

swelling or tenderness in your stomach;

jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes);

unusual vaginal bleeding;

a lump in your breast;

fluid retention (swelling, rapid weight gain); or

high levels of calcium in your blood - nausea, vomiting, stomach pain, loss of appetite, constipation, increased thirst or urination, muscle pain or weakness, joint pain, confusion, and feeling tired or restless.

Common estradiol side effects may include:

vaginal itching or discharge, changes in your menstrual periods, light vaginal bleeding or spotting;

thinning scalp hair; or

nausea, vomiting, bloating, stomach cramps.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Estradiol dosing information

Usual Adult Dose for Postmenopausal Symptoms:

Oral: 0.45 mg to 2 mg orally once a day.

Parenteral: 1 to 5 mg of estradiol cypionate IM every 3 to 4 weeks or 10 to 20 mg of estradiol valerate IM every 4 weeks.

Vaginal Ring: 0.05 mg/day or 0.1 mg/day vaginal ring. The ring should remain in place for 3 months and then be replaced by a new ring if therapy is to continue.

Topical: 0.025 to 0.1 mg/day (transdermal film) applied topically 1 or 2 times a week. Application sites vary according to manufacturer formulation and include the lower abdomen, upper thigh, buttocks, or upper arm. Systems should not be applied to the breasts. 0.05 mg/day (2 foil pouches of transdermal emulsion) applied topically to both legs each morning. 0.25 mg unit dose packet (0.1% transdermal gel) applied topically once daily to the upper right or left thigh at the same time daily. 1.25 g (one spray) EstroGel (0.75 mg/1.25 gm - 0.06% transdermal gel) applied topically to the arms at the same time daily. 1.53 mg (one spray) Evamist (1.53 mg/spray transdermal spray) applied topically to the forearm at the same time daily. 0.87 g (one spray) Elestrin (0.52 mg/1.087 g - 0.06% transdermal gel) applied topically to the upper arm at the same time daily.

Women currently on oral estrogen therapy and changing to a transdermal estradiol system should initiate transdermal therapy 1 week following discontinuation of oral estrogens (sooner if menopausal symptoms reappear). Changes between transdermal systems may be initiated without interruption of therapy.

In general, the duration of hormone therapy for the treatment of postmenopausal symptoms should be limited. Treatment for one to five years is generally sufficient. However, long-term therapy (for the treatment/prophylaxis of osteoporosis and for risk reduction of cardiovascular disease) may be considered during the time in which the patient is being treated for postmenopausal symptoms.

Because of the potential increased risks of cardiovascular events, breast cancer and venous thromboembolic events, use should be limited to the shortest duration consistent with treatment goals and risks for the individual woman, and should be periodically reevaluated. When used solely for the treatment of symptoms of vulvar and vaginal atrophy, topical vaginal products should be considered.

Usual Adult Dose for Atrophic Urethritis:

Oral: 1 to 2 mg orally once a day.

Parenteral: 10 to 20 mg of estradiol valerate IM every 4 weeks.

Vaginal Ring: 0.05 mg/day or 0.1 mg/day vaginal ring. The ring should remain in place for 3 months and then be replaced by a new ring if therapy is to continue.

Topical: 0.025 to 0.1 mg/day (transdermal film) applied topically 1 or 2 times a week. Application sites vary according to manufacturer formulation and include the lower abdomen, upper thigh, buttocks, or upper arm. Systems should not be applied to the breasts. 1.25 g/day (estradiol gel) applied topically at the same time daily. If used solely for the treatment of vulvar and vaginal atrophy, topical vaginal products should be considered.

Women currently on oral estrogen therapy and changing to a transdermal estradiol system should initiate transdermal therapy 1 week following discontinuation of oral estrogens (sooner if menopausal symptoms reappear). Changes between transdermal systems may be initiated without interruption of therapy.

Because of the potential increased risks of cardiovascular events, breast cancer and venous thromboembolic events, use should be limited to the shortest duration consistent with treatment goals and risks for the individual woman, and should be periodically reevaluated. When used solely for the treatment of symptoms of vulvar and vaginal atrophy, topical vaginal products should be considered. In general, the duration of hormone therapy for the treatment of postmenopausal symptoms like atrophic vaginitis, kraurosis vulvae, or atrophic urethritis should be limited. Treatment for one to five years is generally sufficient.

Usual Adult Dose for Atrophic Vaginitis:

Oral: 1 to 2 mg orally once a day.

Parenteral: 10 to 20 mg of estradiol valerate IM every 4 weeks.

Vaginal Ring: 0.05 mg/day or 0.1 mg/day vaginal ring. The ring should remain in place for 3 months and then be replaced by a new ring if therapy is to continue.

Topical: 0.025 to 0.1 mg/day (transdermal film) applied topically 1 or 2 times a week. Application sites vary according to manufacturer formulation and include the lower abdomen, upper thigh, buttocks, or upper arm. Systems should not be applied to the breasts. 1.25 g/day (estradiol gel) applied topically at the same time daily. If used solely for the treatment of vulvar and vaginal atrophy, topical vaginal products should be considered.

Women currently on oral estrogen therapy and changing to a transdermal estradiol system should initiate transdermal therapy 1 week following discontinuation of oral estrogens (sooner if menopausal symptoms reappear). Changes between transdermal systems may be initiated without interruption of therapy.

Because of the potential increased risks of cardiovascular events, breast cancer and venous thromboembolic events, use should be limited to the shortest duration consistent with treatment goals and risks for the individual woman, and should be periodically reevaluated. When used solely for the treatment of symptoms of vulvar and vaginal atrophy, topical vaginal products should be considered. In general, the duration of hormone therapy for the treatment of postmenopausal symptoms like atrophic vaginitis, kraurosis vulvae, or atrophic urethritis should be limited. Treatment for one to five years is generally sufficient.

Usual Adult Dose for Hypoestrogenism:

Oral: 1 to 2 mg orally once a day.

Parenteral: 1.5 to 2 mg of estradiol cypionate IM once a month or 10 to 20 mg estradiol valerate IM every 4 weeks.

Topical: 0.025 to 0.1 mg/day (transdermal film) applied topically 1 or 2 times a week. Application sites vary according to manufacturer formulation and include the lower abdomen, upper thigh, buttocks, or upper arm. Systems should not be applied to the breasts.

Dosages should be titrated according to patient response. Therapy should be maintained with the minimum dosage that will achieve the desired clinical effect.

Usual Adult Dose for Oophorectomy:

Oral: 1 to 2 mg orally once a day.

Parenteral: 10 to 20 mg of estradiol valerate by IM every 4 weeks.

Topical: 0.025 to 0.1 mg/day (transdermal film) applied topically 1 or 2 times a week. Application sites vary according to manufacturer formulation and include the lower abdomen, upper thigh, buttocks, or upper arm. Systems should not be applied to the breasts.

Women currently on oral estrogen therapy and changing to a transdermal estradiol system should initiate transdermal therapy 1 week following discontinuation of oral estrogens (sooner if menopausal symptoms reappear). Changes between transdermal systems may be initiated without interruption of therapy.

Usual Adult Dose for Primary Ovarian Failure:

Oral: 1 to 2 mg orally once a day.

Parenteral: 10 to 20 mg of estradiol valerate by IM every 4 weeks.

Topical: 0.025 to 0.1 mg/day (transdermal film) applied topically 1 or 2 times a week. Application sites vary according to manufacturer formulation and include the lower abdomen, upper thigh, buttocks, or upper arm. Systems should not be applied to the breasts.

Women currently on oral estrogen therapy and changing to a transdermal estradiol system should initiate transdermal therapy 1 week following discontinuation of oral estrogens (sooner if menopausal symptoms reappear). Changes between transdermal systems may be initiated without interruption of therapy.

Usual Adult Dose for Breast Cancer - Palliative:

10 mg orally 3 times a day for at least 3 months. Estrogen therapy for breast cancer should be considered only for palliation in the treatment of metastatic disease in select patients

Usual Adult Dose for Osteoporosis:

Oral: 0.5 mg orally once a day.

Topical: 0.025 to 0.1 mg/day (transdermal film) applied topically 1 or 2 times a week. Systems should not be applied to the breasts. 14 mcg/day weekly (transdermal film) applied topically once a week.

Application sites vary according to manufacturer formulation and include the lower abdomen, upper thigh, buttocks, or upper arm.

In addition to hormonal therapy, adequate calcium intake is important for postmenopausal women who require treatment or prevention of osteoporosis. The average diet of older American women contains 400 to 600 mg of calcium per day. A suggested optimal intake is 1500 mg per day. If dietary intake is insufficient to achieve 1500 mg per day, supplementation may be useful in women who have no contraindication to calcium supplementation.

Long-term therapy (for more than 5 years) is generally necessary in order to obtain substantive benefits in reducing the risk of bone fracture. Maximal benefits are obtained if estrogen therapy is initiated as soon after menopause as possible. The optimal duration of therapy has not been definitively determined.

Women currently on oral estrogen therapy and changing to a transdermal estradiol system should initiate transdermal therapy 1 week following discontinuation of oral estrogens (sooner if menopausal symptoms reappear). Changes between transdermal systems may be initiated without interruption of therapy.

When used solely for the prevention of postmenopausal osteoporosis, approved non-estrogen treatments should carefully be considered, and estrogen and combined estrogen-progestin products should only be considered for women with significant risk of osteoporosis that outweighs the risks of the drug.

Usual Adult Dose for Prostate Cancer:

Oral: 1 to 2 mg orally 3 times a day.

Parenteral: Estradiol valerate 30 mg IM every 1 to 2 weeks.

An apparent response should be noted within 3 months of initiation of therapy. Estrogen therapy for prostate cancer should be considered only for palliation in the treatment of metastatic disease in select patients.

What other drugs will affect estradiol?

Other drugs may interact with estradiol, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal products. Tell each of your health care providers about all medicines you use now and any medicine you start or stop using.

This list is not complete and other drugs may interact with estradiol. Tell your doctor about all medications you use. This includes prescription, over-the-counter, vitamin, and herbal products. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor.

User Reviews for Estradiol

Also known as: Adgyn Estro, Aerodiol, Alora, Bedol, Climara, Climaval, Climodien, Clinagen LA 40, Delestrogen, Delidose, Dep Gynogen, Depo-Estradiol, Depogen, Dermestril, Dermestril Septem, . show all 83 brand names Dioval 40, Dioval XX, Divigel, Dura-Estrin, Duragen, Elestrin, Elleste Solo, Esclim, Estra-C, Estra-V 40, Estrace, Estraderm, Estradiol G GAM, Estradiol Patch, Estradot, Estradot 100, Estradot 37.5, Estradot 50, Estradot 75, Estragyn LA 5, Estrapatch, Estrasorb, Estreva, Estro-Cyp, Estro-LA, Estro-Span 40, Estrofem, Estrogel, Estrogen Patches, Evamist, Evorel, Fematrix, Fempatch, Femring, Femsept, FemSeven, FemSeven Sequi Phase I, FemTab, Femtrace, Femtran, Gynodiol, Gynogen LA 20, Medidiol 10, Menaval-20, Menorest, Menorest Patch, Menostar, Minivelle, Nuvelle TS Phase I, Oesclim, Oestradiol Implants, Oestrodose, Oestrogel, Oestrogel Pump-Pack, Organon Oestradiol, Oromone, Primogyn Depot, Progynova, Progynova TS, Provames, Sandrena, Systen, Thais, Thaissept, Valergen, Vivelle, Vivelle-Dot, Zumenon

The following information is NOT intended to endorse drugs or recommend therapy. While these reviews might be helpful, they are not a substitute for the expertise, skill, knowledge and judgement of healthcare practitioners in patient care.

Primary Ovarian Failure

Summary of Estradiol reviews

Reviews for Estradiol

Climara (estradiol) for Postmenopausal Symptoms: "I am 50 years old I had a Total Abdominal Hysterectomy in April and have been suffering wicked hot sweats. I would sweat so badly that my hair, legs feet, hands and face would get wet. so disgusting. It would take me a while to dry off. I started this patch on Monday and within 12 hours, I noticed a difference and within 24 hours, the wet sweats were gone. I have to keep all the fans on in my house and have an industrial fan that I would stand in front of during my flashes. Yesterday ( day 2), I did not have to turn on a single fan and my wet sweats are completely gone. I only had a headache the first night and now I feel fantastic and normal. I still have the occasional hot flash but it is short and I don't break out in a sweat."

TrudyEllen11 September 14, 2016

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Evamist (estradiol) for Postmenopausal Symptoms: "LOVE this estrogen therapy. Have tried the gels and patches and this is by far the easiest to use. It's like spraying perfume on before I walk out the door every morning, I'm only using one spray a day. Besides getting rid of my night sweats, I have more energy and feel much happier - even though I never knew how unhappy I really was until using Evamist. I got a co-pay card from my Dr and with my insurance it costs less than $25 a month. I think it's a bargain at any price! Strongly recommend you try it"

LuvmyHRT August 31, 2016

2 users found this comment helpful. Did you? Yes No

Estradiol Patch (estradiol) for Postmenopausal Symptoms: "I was caught in a vicious cycle of soaking wet hot flash after soaking wet hot flash which caused me to become agitated which caused my heart to race ALL NIGHT LONG which then caused me to be irritable and I could barely focus during the day. My doctor started me on the estradiol patch .05 mg and within a few days I felt like a new person. I now go through the entire night maybe one minor hot flash and the resulting anxiety is gone. I sleep now better than I ever have. The only side effect I have noticed is that my breasts are a little tender but not enough to make me stop. If I wind up gaining a few pounds who cares I am a human being again."

MrsSPT August 23, 2016

3 users found this comment helpful. Did you? Yes No

For Atrophic Vaginitis: "I believe I don't need to take vagifem, yes I have a prolapse, I am awaiting an operation, but the side effects have been terrible, weight loss, loss of appetite, enlarged stomach, lethargic, stomach pain. So I have decided not to continue with this medication ,"

Nanny1086 (taken for 1 to 6 months) July 21, 2016

0 users found this comment helpful. Did you? Yes No

Vivelle-Dot (estradiol) for Postmenopausal Symptoms: "I was on the Vivelle-dot for about 8 years. It took away all the unpleasantness of menopause: the insomnia, the crying, the hot flashes, the dizziness, the panic attacks. And I had absolutely no side effects. Life was great. Then, I stupidly tried to use something different in order to save money (the estradiol pill) and all the menopause horrors came back, along with new ones (nausea, acid reflux, non-stop migraines. I went back on the Vivelle-dot and felt so much better. Financially, it is a bit expensive, but I switched to the generic by Sandoz and it effects me the same as vivelle-dot. Pure bliss."

A Happy patch user (taken for 5 to 10 years) July 8, 2016

11 users found this comment helpful. Did you? Yes No

Femring (estradiol) for Postmenopausal Symptoms: "I'm at the end of my second dose of Femring after having both ovaries removed at 35. When I first went on Femring .1 mg daily it was great. I had a couple day days after initial insertion that I felt edgy emotionally - but after day 4 that leveled off. Felt much better than oral estradiol. However, around day 60 my estrogen levels started to dive and by day 80 I was back into full surgical meno. When I inserted the second ring. same as before. An initial surge of estrodiol but this time the ring started to tank around day 35. I'm on day 85 of the second ring and my meno symptoms are unbearable. For me, this is not a 90 day med. Too bad - for 1-2 months it's perfect. My insurance won't allow me to refill until day 90 - and $$$."

meno-v July 5, 2016

3 users found this comment helpful. Did you? Yes No

For Postmenopausal Symptoms: "I tried to wan off my other not so effective hormone pills but suffered terrible back lashes. So I went to see a different and more experienced OBGYN doctor and began applying Estradiol 0.05 coupled with Progesterone 100MG treatment. Takes about 10 days to see the full positive results. I am almost one month on this treatment now, and it has stopped hot flushes, I sleep through the night, stopped horrible stress attacks, stopped near fainting temperature surge, my face skin looks tighter and younger, and strangely, makes me think about the birds and the bees. Knock on wood, I hope this medicine works for me for a long time to come. I am 64 years old, 5'3, weight 126 lbs. Use alcohol wipe and dry skin before applying patch, sticks better."

Lily323 July 4, 2016

17 users found this comment helpful. Did you? Yes No

Femring (estradiol) for Postmenopausal Symptoms: "I was placed on Femring to help with my menopausal symptoms without causing harm to my liver. I was diagnosed with a liver disorder and this has ben a blessing for me and relieved all my symptoms. It can be difficult to insert at 1st but no different than a diaphragm. I have no discomfort or pain and cannot tell it is there. The only downside is the cost."

Blondie97702 June 29, 2016

3 users found this comment helpful. Did you? Yes No

For Postmenopausal Symptoms: "I have been on this 1mg pill a day for 1 month. I could not stand myself mood swings, irratble, my husband said I was a complete different person, just after a month. my insurance does pay. I only have to pay 8 dollors a month for it my husband said he would pay 100.00 dollors for it lol plus have lost weight on it also very happy with it saved my marriage"

Lday lucy123 (taken for less than 1 month) June 16, 2016

19 users found this comment helpful. Did you? Yes No

Estradiol Patch (estradiol) for Hypoestrogenism: "I used the patch for night time hot flashes that wake me up every 2-3hrs. The size was great, and it stuck just fine. That's where the happy union ended. By the second day the hot flashes seemed to triple, occurring all day and all night. And the flashes were hotter! I also began to have terrible headaches that woke me up earlier than my alarm clock and hung around all day. I never have headaches so I removed the patch after only 4 days and the symptoms all went away. Now I'm back to square one better able to deal with my original symptoms knowing things could be worse. I'm going to give the name brand Vivelle dot a try and see what happens."

50yr old with Hysterectomy (taken for less than 1 month) May 19, 2016

4 users found this comment helpful. Did you? Yes No

Climara (estradiol) for Postmenopausal Symptoms: "Climara Pro Estradiol Patch has reduced my hot flashes by 99%. The once a week patch takes a good three to four weeks to work. You will not find relief quickly, but once it kicks in, no hot flashes. This drug is very expensive, over $100 per month, but if you can afford it, I highly recommend it. Wipe your skin with alcohol, let dry, then apply patch--sticks better."

Elise2016 May 9, 2016

11 users found this comment helpful. Did you? Yes No

For Postmenopausal Symptoms: "I had a full hysterectomy years ago, leaving one ovary. About a year ago I started having hot flashes, hair loss, feeling tired, etc. I went to my doctors and they ran blood work. We found out I had an underactive tyroid and was going through peri-menapause. I got on medication for my tyroid, but nothing for menapause. After a year of hot flashes and feeling like crap I went to my OBGYN yesterday. He gave me Estradiol 1mg. You have to take this with food so we went to lunch after lunch about 11:30am I took my first pill, ever. Last night I only turned the fan on once when it had been on full blast everynight for almost a year. Today, I've taken my 2nd pill ever and I haven't had not one hot flash and I feel a little more alert. "

Feelnsexi49 (taken for less than 1 month) May 7, 2016

9 users found this comment helpful. Did you? Yes No

Climara (estradiol) for Postmenopausal Symptoms: "I've only been using the .025 patch since yesterday. I have not noticed any decrease in hot flashes yet. However, I am looking forward to giving the patch a try. But, I noticed this morning that I have an allergic reaction to the adhesive. I don't want to remove it but don't want to continue to irritate my skin."

2youngforthis April 29, 2016

2 users found this comment helpful. Did you? Yes No

For Postmenopausal Symptoms: "It didn't help with my hot flashes. I started experiencing a warm sensation, like I stood next to a heater, on my lower left outside calf all day everyday. I am getting a pain in my left arm. Dizziness and heart palpitations."

TerriBlueberry April 17, 2016

3 users found this comment helpful. Did you? Yes No

Femring (estradiol) for Postmenopausal Symptoms: ""My body does not like this ring - it is quite hard, large, and terribly uncomfortable, paid $100 for it, WITH insurance. Estradiol acetate, which is the kind of estradiol provided in this ring, has to pass through the liver, which is an inefficient way for the body to absorb." In reference to the second reviewer, Femring is a transdermal estrogen and it does not have first pass metabolism through the liver. Only oral estrogens do that. It also is not hard and if placed at the top of a normal vagina (which expands - a hysterectomy cut vagina does not do as well), you won't know it is there. I have personally used this for over 10 years and have prescribed it to 100s of patients. Over 90% loved it - except for the cost."

Anonymous (taken for 10 years or more) March 24, 2016

8 users found this comment helpful. Did you? Yes No

Divigel (estradiol) for Postmenopausal Symptoms: "I used Divigel for a few weeks. I've been having pre menopause symptoms. I had a hysterectomy but still have my ovaries. During this time I started having severe stomach pains and my ovaries hurt. The doctor performed a ultrasound. I couldn't believe the pain. The doctor told me that I may need my ovaries removed. I decided to stop using Divigel and the pain stopped. I wouldn't recommend this medication."

Beccalou05 (taken for less than 1 month) March 20, 2016

4 users found this comment helpful. Did you? Yes No

For Postmenopausal Symptoms: "When I first started taking estradiol I was having allot of issues with hair loss, hot flashes, moodiness, vaginal dryness and bladder leakage. In short, all of the nasty side affects of menopause from my total hysterictamy. After a short time on HRT, I've noticed an improvement of all the symptoms. I normally hate taking pills and it's hard for me to stay on a regimented course of pill taking. But the positives far outweigh the negatives in this, so I have been faithful in taking my little blue pill daily. HRT isn't for everyone, but it seems to be working for me."

Fabrin March 15, 2016

21 users found this comment helpful. Did you? Yes No

Estradiol Patch (estradiol) for Postmenopausal Symptoms: "This patch had to be designed by a man. What woman would design a patch the size of a softball? I had to duck tape it on in order for it to stay on, it is not flexible ( it would not even bend in half) and what woman wants to have a big round patch showing through her clothes? You can't swim with it on or even shower because it will come off. It is hideous and degrading. Why should a woman have to be punished for something that is beyond their control? I can not say if it works or not, due to the fact that I could never get it to stay on. I took one to my doctor and asked her how I was suppose to keep it on. She was shocked at what it looked liked and put me on the pill due to the Insurance Company."

Wagon February 26, 2016

13 users found this comment helpful. Did you? Yes No

Femring (estradiol) for Postmenopausal Symptoms: "Great experience with Femring and it's the only hormone replacement that works for me. Wishing it was not so expensive."

Anonymous (taken for 5 to 10 years) February 20, 2016

7 users found this comment helpful. Did you? Yes No

Estradiol Patch (estradiol) for Postmenopausal Symptoms: "this medication saved my life. I actually like the mylan better than the vivelle as far as the way I feel, the vivelle caused sinus problems and gassy bloat, the mylan product did not for me, however the mylan product doesn't stick as well or last as long. OVERALL: I love estrogen replacement and it is a TRAGEDY that women are suffering and their docs are not offering HRT when it is now proven that HRT prolongs life and has a protective influence on heart, bones and brain. I want to tell every woman out there do not be a hero, do not suffer, and do not be afraid. estrogen is good for you and can give you your life back. why do none of the women I talk to know this? crime!!"

loribean February 19, 2016

58 users found this comment helpful. Did you? Yes No

Estradiol Patch (estradiol) for Postmenopausal Symptoms: "I have been on the estradiol patch (Vivelle) for three weeks and I feel like a new woman! Gone are the hot flashes, night sweats and brain fog. Hello energy I've missed you immensely! I also take 100 mg progesterone at bedtime. This combo is a game changer! Just wondering why I didn't pursue it sooner."

nwilling February 16, 2016

33 users found this comment helpful. Did you? Yes No

For Postmenopausal Symptoms: "Seemed to work overnight. Instant relief from mood swings, night sweats. Am using it in conjunction with progesterone at night. Sleep better and don't feel discontent with everything."

Paigepoo1 January 14, 2016

32 users found this comment helpful. Did you? Yes No

Femring (estradiol) for Postmenopausal Symptoms: "For the first 3 months things were great. On my second Femring I began to get a rash on my forehead and neck. My neck was especially red, itchy and dry. At first I thought it might be due to something else. Perhaps Eczema or psoriasis, so I was buying all kinds of creams and nothing worked. So I double checked my only prescription which is the femring and low and behold one of the possible side effects is a skin rash. It's too soon to know for sure. I hope it goes away."

Don't rash me (taken for 1 to 6 months) January 12, 2016

8 users found this comment helpful. Did you? Yes No

For Oophorectomy: "The Vivelle Dot worked beautifully. My insurance company switched me to Sandoz generic and the adhesive is awful. This brand leaves adhesive on everything - me, my underwear, my clothes. This is when it sticks properly."

Exondys 51 Exondys 51 (eteplirsen) is a morpholino antisense oligomer for the treatment of Duchenne muscular.

Kyleena Kyleena (levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system) is a low-dose progestin-containing.

Yosprala Yosprala (aspirin and omeprazole) is a platelet aggregation inhibitor and proton pump inhibitor.

Cuvitru Cuvitru (immune globulin subcutaneous (human)) is indicated as replacement therapy in the treatment.

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BUY GYNOGEN INJ INJ. Uni-Sank. PRICE & SIDE EFFECTS

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Buy GYNOGEN in the INJ form. GYNOGEN price is 625.00/865.00 INR, USD#VALUE. GYNOGEN side effects are because of Anatomical Therapeutic action which we can find in its atc code. GYNOGEN INJ dosages – specified by physician as. GYNOGEN 75/150 IU. INJ. uses are in various complications related to ATA (anatomical therapeutic action). Approved Universal name by FDA (Generic Name) for the drug is Menotrophin (Fsh & Lh 1:1) .

GYNOGEN All Brief Details.

Generic Name – Menotrophin (Fsh & Lh 1:1)

Medicine Strength – 75/150 IU.

Form of dosage – INJ

Manufacturer Company – Uni-Sank.

Country of Manufacturing – India

Medicine Market India

Medicine Market India

Medicine Packing INJ.

Medicine Price For Public 625.00/865.00

Drug Importer – Uni-Sank.

Currency of drug Price INR, USD, GBP

Legal Availability for public – By prescription.

Medicine Contents Menotrophin (Fsh & Lh 1:1)

licencing Status MCI and FDA approved

Medicine Status – In Market.

Buy GYNOGEN

is available in India and sold at almost every medical store, you can not buy GYNOGEN without prescription . You can Buy it from Uni-Sank. Physical form sold is INJ.

Buy GYNOGEN at cheap price

In international market you can buy GYNOGEN INJ 75/150 IU. in different brands and strengh, Uni-Sank. sales it in India. You can not buy GYNOGEN without prescription . You can buy GYNOGEN online also from Uni-Sank. To buy GYNOGEN online you need prescription.

Buy GYNOGEN online

To buy GYNOGEN online with credit card you may need a prescription from physicians, several websites sales online with active ingredients – Menotrophin (Fsh & Lh 1:1). TO buy GYNOGEN online at low price you should consider different brands of the generic ingredients. For fast delivery youn may consider Uni-Sank. You can buy it online from Uni-Sank. India. GYNOGEN buy rate keep fluctuating with time and demand and this rate defines the Market price of the brand. Historical data of Drug demand fluctuation with years is given here.

Increasing %age of Buy online rate Buy year

Rise or fall in Drug Demand

Buy GYNOGEN Without prescription.

GYNOGEN is legally available only with a prescription, You will need a prescription from Authorized physician in India to buy anywhere. Online stores also require prescription to buy GYNOGEN. You can not buy GYNOGEN without prescription.

GYNOGEN Price

GYNOGEN price list keep fluctuating, however the price of GYNOGEN in India is fixed by govt of India. However different brands have different price. IN brand of Uni-Sank. – GYNOGEN, the price of Menotrophin (Fsh & Lh 1:1) is – 625.00/865.00 INR, in usa USD#VALUE.

Price in India

GYNOGEN price in India is less than GYNOGEN price in United Kingdom and price in usa . This difference in GYNOGEN price is because of Market demand, Cost of production and the taxes applied by different govt on Uni-Sank. Price of GYNOGEN in India – 625.00/865.00 INR.

However actual price keep fluctutating with time and demand, Historical data of GYNOGEN price.

GYNOGEN Price in INDIA By year

GYNOGEN side effects in pregnancy

Using GYNOGEN during pregnancy may raise the risk of children developing some disorder (commpon for some such kind of drugs), however it depends upon how GYNOGEN ingredients pass through placenta and may have effect on baby – Strength of GYNOGEN – 75/150 IU. is major factor in determination of such side effects, The possible danger in pregnancy are under research. Uni-Sank. India publish leaflet about GYNOGEN every update to describe possible risks of using GYNOGEN side effect in pregnancy and pregnant women. You may download Uni-Sank. issued leaflet regarding side effects of GYNOGEN – Menotrophin (Fsh & Lh 1:1).

Side effects in childern and baby

Fda evaluation is still uncomplete. However common GYNOGEN side effects are

1. Mental activity changes by Menotrophin (Fsh & Lh 1:1).

2. Metabolic changes beacuse of Menotrophin (Fsh & Lh 1:1).

3. GYNOGEN caused Growth rate alteration.

Exact effects depends upon mode of therapeutic action on childern.

overdose

Exact dosage of GYNOGEN – Menotrophin (Fsh & Lh 1:1) INJ is prescribed by the Physician Depending upon age, weight, gender and kind of disease etc. However overdosing may cause GYNOGEN toxicity.

In case of Overdose Toxicity of GYNOGEN contact USA – 1-800-222-1222 .

Poison Control UK – 0845 4647

Poison Control India – 102

Generic name & Brand Name

Generic name is the FDA approved universal name of the drug or the chemical without branding. Brand name is the company specified name for marketing of the drug by a special name patent to them. GYNOGEN itself is a brand name.

What is GYNOGEN generic name ?

The active ingredients of the GYNOGEN are Menotrophin (Fsh & Lh 1:1) and its generic name is – Menotrophin (Fsh & Lh 1:1).

Dosage and Route of Administration.

Exact Dosage ( how much GYNOGEN patient have to take.), Dosage form (Form of Menotrophin (Fsh & Lh 1:1) Medicine.) and route of administration (How Menotrophin (Fsh & Lh 1:1) have to be administered).

Route of Administration

The medicine GYNOGEN must be given to the patient as physician specify. however the route of administration depends upon physical form of GYNOGEN and it is – INJ.

Dosage detail

Dosage of 75/150 IU. GYNOGEN – Menotrophin (Fsh & Lh 1:1) is of the volume or size INJ.. The clinical dosage is specified by the physician.

Expiry Period.

Menotrophin (Fsh & Lh 1:1) – GYNOGEN Expiry period is the time period after which GYNOGEN is not medically usable or expired. The exact expiry period after manufacturing is 48 months. After 48 months GYNOGEN is medically not usable. To keep Menotrophin (Fsh & Lh 1:1) – GYNOGEN in best condition always 25 celcius.

Drug Interactions

GYNOGEN may interact with some other drug or may have side effects. Side effects and drug interaction caused by GYNOGEN on different organs can be calculated using ATC CODE.

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Related Posts

Estradiol

Estradiol is a form of estrogen. a female sex hormone that's produced by the ovaries.

Estradiol comes in an oral form, a transdermal skin patch, a vaginal ring, or as a topical gel, spray, or emulsion.

The drug is available under several brand names such as Estrace (oral pill); EvaMist (spray); Vagifem (vaginal pill); Estring, Femring (vaginal rings); Climara, Alora (skin patches); and Divigel and Estrogel (topical gels).

Estradiol is used to treat and prevent hot flushes in women experiencing menopause. Estradiol gel is also used to treat vaginal dryness, itching, and burning in menopausal women.

Estradiol is also commonly combined with progestins in various doses in oral contraceptive pills that prevent pregnancy by preventing ovulation.

The medicine may also be used to prevent osteoporosis. replace estrogen in women with ovarian failure, or as part of a cancer treatment regimen.

Estradiol is in a class of drugs called estrogen hormones. It works by replacing the estrogen that the body normally produces.

Estradiol Warnings

Estradiol can increase the risk that you will develop endometrial cancer (cancer of the lining of the uterus). If you've had a hysterectomy. you should take progestin along with estradiol to decrease this risk.

However, before taking these two medicines together, talk with your doctor about your risk for other health problems.

In one study, women who took estrogens (such as estradiol) by mouth with progestin had a higher risk of heart attacks. stroke. blood clots, breast cancer. and dementia.

Women who use topical estradiol alone or with progestin may also have a higher risk of developing these conditions.

Using topical estradiol may increase your risk of developing ovarian cancer and gallbladder disease. You should talk to your doctor about these risks.

Before taking estradiol, tell your doctor if you have or have ever had:

A heart attack or stroke

Heart disease

Blood clots

Any type of cancer

Abnormal vaginal bleeding

High blood pressure

High cholesterol

Diabetes

Asthma

Gallbladder disease

A thyroid disorder

Epilepsy or another seizure disorder

Liver disease

Lupus

Breast lumps or abnormal mammogram results

Uterine fibroids

Yellowing of the skin or eyes (jaundice )

Migraine headaches

Endometriosis (a condition where the type of tissue that lines the uterus grows in other areas of the body, usually the abdomen or pelvis)

Low levels of calcium in your blood

Porphyria (a condition where abnormal substances build up in the blood)

Also, tell your doctor if you smoke or use tobacco products.

You should use the lowest dose of estradiol for the shortest time possible to control your symptoms.

Talk with your doctor every three to six months to determine if you should lower your dose or stop using this medicine.

You should conduct a breast self-exam every month and have a mammogram and clinical breast exam (a breast exam by a health professional) every year to help detect breast cancer.

Tell your doctor if you are having surgery or will be on bed rest while taking estradiol. Your doctor may tell you to stop taking the medication to decrease the risk of blood clots.

The topical medicine may harm other people who touch your skin. You should not let anyone else touch the skin where you applied estradiol for one hour after application.

If someone does touch the area, he or she should wash his or her hands with soap and water immediately.

Pregnancy and Estradiol

Estradiol can harm an unborn baby or cause birth defects. You should not use this medication while pregnant.

Tell your doctor right away if you become pregnant or might become pregnant while taking this drug.

Since estradiol can also pass into breast milk, talk to your doctor before breastfeeding while taking the drug.

Q: Does estradiol cause weight gain?

A: Estrogens, a group of steroid compounds, are used as part of some oral contraceptives, and in estrogen replacement therapy for postmenopausal women. Common side effects include headache, breast pain, irregular vaginal bleeding or spotting, stomach/abdominal cramps, bloating, nausea and vomiting, and hair loss. Other side effects have been reported with estrogen and/or progestin therapy including increase or decrease in weight. These are not all the possible side effects of estrogen. For a complete list, ask your doctor or pharmacist. For more detailed information, consult with your physician or pharmacist about the potential for side effects based on your specific condition and current medications.

Q: I started on estradiol about two weeks ago, and haven't had a period in about a year. I am now bleeding again. How long can I expect this to go on? It's been about 5 days now and shows no sign of stopping. I'm 54 years old.

A: While changes in your periods can be expected on estradiol, patients should contact their healthcare provider right away for any unusual vaginal bleeding. This could be a sign of a serious side effect. You may also find helpful information at http://www. everydayhealth. com/drugs/estradiol

Q: Does Estradiol cause weight gain?

A: Possibly. While weight gain is a possible side effect of any hormone, I have not heard very many woman complain about estrogens causing weight gain.

Q: How safe is estradiol? I am using it for hot flashes. What are the benefits and the risks?

A: Estrogen products are approved for the treatment of menopausal symptoms, including hot flashes. There have been several studies done by the Women's Health Initiative that have found that there is an increased risk of stroke and deep vein thrombosis (blood clots) in women 50 to 79 years of age during 7 years of treatment with 0.625mg of premarin daily. It has also been found that estrogen alone does not increase the risk of breast cancer, and in fact may decrease the risk. It is recommended to use the lowest effective dose for your symptoms for the shortest period of time. Here is a link to more information on estradiol: http://www. everydayhealth. com/drugs/estradiol Lori Poulin, PharmD

Q: I am currently taking estradiol. My hot flashes seem to be under control for now; however, my mood swings have increased. I have tried several different things, such as creams and vitamins like black cohosh. What do you recommend? My doctor seems to just increase the estradiol.

A: Estradiol is a form of estrogen that is used for a variety of conditions. Estradiol is used to relieve the symptoms of menopause, primarily hot flashes, when estrogen levels are decreasing. Mood changes are also a symptom of low estrogen and a side effect of estradiol. Most women experience some

Q: Is there a generic for Vivelle-Dot?

A: There is currently no generic equivalent available for Vivelle-Dot (estradiol transdermal system). Vivelle-Dot is a small patch containing a form of estrogen commonly used to treat ovarian disorders, infertility, abnormal bleeding, and to prevent the symptoms associated with menopause. Common side effects associated with Vivelle-Dot may include nausea, vomiting, loss of appetite, swollen breasts, acne, changes in skin color, decreased sex drive, migraine headaches, dizziness, vaginal pain, swelling of the ankles and feet, or changes in menstrual cycle. Although Vivelle-Dot does not have a generic equivalent, there is another estradiol patch available. This patch, called estradiol patch, is a generic equivalent of the Estraderm Patch. Side effects associated with Estraderm are the same as Vivelle-Dot. The Estraderm Patch, and the generic equivalent, is a larger patch then the Vivelle-Dot patch. Talk to your doctor about which treatment option best meets your needs. For more specific information, consult with your doctor or pharmacist for guidance based on your health status and current medications, particularly before taking any action. Jennifer Carey, PharmD

By Lynn Marks | Medically Reviewed by Robert Jasmer, MD

Latest Update: 2015-01-08 Copyright © 2014 Everyday Health Media, LLC

Cephalexin side effects in detail, cephalex

Cephalexin Side Effects

For the Consumer

Applies to cephalexin: oral capsule, oral powder for suspension, oral tablet, oral tablet for suspension

In addition to its needed effects, some unwanted effects may be caused by cephalexin. In the event that any of these side effects do occur, they may require medical attention.

Major Side Effects

You should check with your doctor immediately if any of these side effects occur when taking cephalexin:

More common:

Diarrhea

Rare

Abdominal or stomach pain

blistering, peeling, or loosening of the skin

chills

clay-colored stools

cough

dark urine

diarrhea

dizziness

fever

general tiredness and weakness

headache

itching

joint or muscle pain

light-colored stools

loss of appetite

nausea and vomiting

rash

red skin lesions, often with a purple center

red, irritated eyes

sore throat

sores, ulcers, or white spots in the mouth or on the lips

unpleasant breath odor

unusual tiredness or weakness

upper right abdominal or stomach pain

vomiting of blood

yellow eyes or skin

Incidence not known:

Abdominal or stomach cramps or tenderness

back or leg pains

black, tarry stools

bleeding gums

bloating

blood in the urine or stools

chest pain

coughing up blood

diarrhea, watery and severe, which may also be bloody

difficulty with breathing or swallowing

fast heartbeat

general body swelling

hives

increased menstrual flow or vaginal bleeding

increased thirst

large, hive-like swelling on the face, eyelids, lips, tongue, throat, hands, legs, feet, or sex organs

loss of appetite

nosebleeds

pain

painful or difficult urination

pale skin

paralysis

pinpoint red spots on the skin

prolonged bleeding from cuts

puffiness or swelling of the eyelids or around the eyes, face, lips, or tongue

red or black, tarry stools

red or dark brown urine

shortness of breath

swollen or painful glands

tightness in the chest

unusual bleeding or bruising

unusual weight loss

watery or bloody diarrhea

wheezing

Minor Side Effects

Some of the side effects that can occur with cephalexin may not need medical attention. As your body adjusts to the medicine during treatment these side effects may go away. Your health care professional may also be able to tell you about ways to reduce or prevent some of these side effects. If any of the following side effects continue, are bothersome or if you have any questions about them, check with your health care professional:

Incidence not known:

Acid or sour stomach

anxiety

belching

burning feeling in the chest or stomach

difficulty with moving

dry mouth

heartburn

hives or welts

hyperventilation

indigestion

irregular heartbeats

irritability

itching of the vagina or genital area

muscle pain or stiffness

nervousness

pain during sexual intercourse

pain, swelling, or redness in the joints

redness of the skin

restlessness

seeing, hearing, or feeling things that are not there

shaking

stomach upset

trouble with sleeping

white or brownish vaginal discharge

For Healthcare Professionals

Applies to cephalexin: oral capsule, oral powder for reconstitution, oral tablet, oral tablet dispersible

General

Cephalexin is generally well-tolerated. Large studies report an overall 6% incidence of side effects, some of which may not be related to cephalexin. [Ref ]

Hypersensitivity

Hypersensitivity side effects have included fever, urticaria, rash, eosinophilia, anaphylaxis, angioedema, contact dermatitis, erythema multiforme, Stevens-Johnson syndrome, toxic epidermal necrolysis, acute paronychia, and hepatitis. [Ref ]

Up to 20% of patients with a penicillin allergy may be allergic to cephalexin. [Ref ]

Gastrointestinal

Gastrointestinal side effects have included diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, dyspepsia, abdominal cramping, anorexia, and anal pruritus. Diarrhea due to Clostridium difficile colitis has been reported with some cephalosporins. [Ref ]

If diarrhea occurs and it does not resolve with discontinuation of the drug and/or institution of standard antidiarrheal therapy, pseudomembranous colitis should be suspected. [Ref ]

Hepatic

Hepatic side effects have included transient elevations of liver function tests, transient hepatitis, and rare cases of cholestatic jaundice. [Ref ]

Renal

Renal side effects have rarely included interstitial nephritis. Reversible fever, azotemia, pyuria and eosinophiluria are the hallmarks of cephalosporin-induced interstitial nephritis. Acute tubular necrosis has also been reported. [Ref ]

Hematologic

Hematologic side effects have included eosinophilia, neutropenia, thrombocytopenia and hemolytic anemia. [Ref ]

Nervous system

Nervous system side effects have included dizziness, fatigue, headache, agitation, confusion, and hallucinations. Reversible ototoxicity and vertigo, apparently due to labyrinthine disease, have been reported in a few patients with renal disease. [Ref ]

Genitourinary

Genitourinary side effects have included genital pruritus, genital moniliasis, vaginitis, and vaginal discharge. [Ref ]

Musculoskeletal

Musculoskeletal side effects have included arthralgia, arthritis, and joint disorder. [Ref ]

Dermatologic

Dermatologic side effects have included urticaria, rash, contact dermatitis, erythema multiforme, and toxic epidermal necrolysis. Acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis has been reported. [Ref ]

References

1. "Product Information. Keflex (cephalexin)." Dista Products Company, Indianapolis, IN.

2. Burt RA "A review of the drug events reported by 12,917 patients treated with cephalexin." Postgrad Med J 59 (1983): 47-50,51-3

3. Filipe P, Almeida RSLS, Rodrigo FG "Occupational allergic contact dermatitis from cephalosporins." Contact Dermatitis 34 (1996): 226

4. Moellering RC Jr, Swartz MN "The newer cephalosporins." N Engl J Med 294 (1976): 24-8

5. Milligan A, Douglas WS "Contact dermatitis to cephalexin." Contact Dermatitis 15 (1986): 91

6. Jackson H, Vion B, Levy PM "Generalized eruptive pustular drug rash due to cephalexin." Dermatology 177 (1988): 292-4

7. Dave J, Heathcock R, Fenelon L, et al "Cephalexin induced toxic epidermal necrolysis." J Antimicrob Chemother 28 (1991): 477-8

8. Baran R, Perrin C "Fixed-drug eruption presenting as an acute paronychia." Br J Dermatol 125 (1991): 592-5

9. Hogan DJ, Rooney ME "Toxic epidermal necrolysis due to cephalexin." J Am Acad Dermatol 17 (1987): 852-3

10. Harnar TJ, Dobke M, Simoni J, Ninnemann JL "Toxic epidermal necrolysis complicated by severe wound sepsis: a case study." J Burn Care Rehabil 8 (1987): 554-7

11. Raff MJ "Cephalexin in lower respiratory tract infections." Postgrad Med J 59 (1983): 32-9

12. Manoharan A, Kot T "Cephalexin-induced haemolytic anaemia." Med J Aust 147 (1987): 202

13. Ammann R, Neftel K, Hardmeier T, Reinhardt M "Cephalosporin-induced cholestatic jaundice." Lancet 2 (1982): 336-7

14. Ramakrishnan K, Scheid DC "Diagnosis and management of acute pyelonephritis in adults." Am Fam Physician 71 (2005): 933-42

15. Longstreth KL, Robbins SD, Smavatkul C, Doe NS "Cephalexin-induced acute tubular necrosis." Pharmacotherapy 24 (2004): 808-11

16. Sennesael J, Verbeelen D, Lauwers S "Ototoxicity associated with cephalexin in two patients with renal failure." Lancet 2 (1982): 1154-5

17. Wolf R, Dechner E, Ophir J, Brenner S "Cephalexin: a nonthiol drug that may induced pemphigus vulgaris." Int J Dermatol 30 (1991): 213-5

18. Holscher CM, Mauck SK, Armstrong L, Buchanan JA "Man with rash and nausea. Acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis after cephalexin use." Ann Emerg Med 58 (2011): 508, 516

Not all side effects for cephalexin may be reported. You should always consult a doctor or healthcare professional for medical advice. Side effects can be reported to the FDA here .

More about cephalexin

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Disclaimer: Every effort has been made to ensure that the information provided is accurate, up-to-date and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. In addition, the drug information contained herein may be time sensitive and should not be utilized as a reference resource beyond the date hereof. This material does not endorse drugs, diagnose patients, or recommend therapy. This information is a reference resource designed as supplement to, and not a substitute for, the expertise, skill. knowledge, and judgement of healthcare practitioners in patient care. The absence of a warning for a given drug or combination thereof in no way should be construed to indicate safety, effectiveness, or appropriateness for any given patient. Drugs. com does not assume any responsibility for any aspect of healthcare administered with the aid of materials provided. The information contained herein is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. If you have questions about the substances you are taking, check with your doctor, nurse, or pharmacist.

Drug Status

Buying orthonett novum cheap price, orthonett novum

Lynoral (Ethinyl Estradiol) is used for oral contraceptive pill preparations where it is combined with a synthetic progesterone drug. It is a synthetic estrogen similar to the natural female sex hormone estradiol and ia also used as a natural estrogen supplement when the body's production is low, then it is used to control abnormal bleeding from the uterus, and to treat delayed sexual development in females. Lynoral (Ethinyl Estradiol) In conjunction with cyproterone is used to treat severe acne in women. Certain cancers of the prostate respond to Lynoral (Ethinyl Estradiol).

Your doctor will prescribe the correct dosage of Ethinyl Estradiol for your condition. Follow the directions on your prescription label carefully, and ask your doctor to explain any part you do not understand. Do not use more or less than prescribed by your doctor. Do not stop using Lynoral (Ethinyl Estradiol) without talking to your doctor.

Take the medicine as prescribed by your doctor.

If you miss a dose, use it as soon as you remember. If it is near the time of the next dose, take the missed dose and resume your usual dosing schedule; this may mean taking two tablets in one day. If you miss two or more doses in a row, use an alternate birth control method (e. g. condoms, spermicides) for at least 7 days and consult the product information or your doctor for a new dosing schedule.

Store at room temperature between 59 and 86 degrees F (15 and 30 degrees C) away from light and moisture.

Active ingredient: Ethinylestradiol

Ethinyl estradiol is a progesterone and estrogen combination birth control pill. It works by preventing ovulation, thickening the mucus in the cervix, and changing the lining of the uterus.

Smoking increases the risk of serious adverse effects on the heart and circulation with Lynoral (Ethinyl Estradiol).

Antihypertensive drugs and diuretics may have their effectiveness reduced by Lynoral (Ethinyl Estradiol).

Lynoral (Ethinyl Estradiol) should not be used in women, especially women who are pregnant or plan to get pregnant. It may harm the fetus.

Antibiotics may reduce the effectiveness of oral contraceptives containing this drug.

Taking anticonvulsants may require a higher dose of oral contraceptives.

Side effects may include:

Actoplus met, dopili

Diabetes - Dopili (Brand name: actoplus met)

Actoplus Met (Pioglitazone/Metformin)

Actoplus Met is used for treating type 2 diabetes. It is used along with diet and exercise. It may be used alone or with other antidiabetic medicines.

Use Actoplus Met as directed by your doctor. Check the label on the medicine for exact dosing instructions. An extra patient leaflet is available with Actoplus Met. Talk to your pharmacist if you have questions about this information. Take Actoplus Met by mouth with meals. Take Actoplus Met on a regular schedule to get the most benefit from it. Taking Actoplus Met at the same times each day will help you remember to take it. Continue to take Actoplus Met even if you feel well. Do not miss any doses.

Drug Class and Mechanism

Actoplus Met is a biguanide and thiazolidinedione antidiabetic combination. It works by decreasing the amount of sugar the liver produces and the intestines absorb. It also helps to make your body more sensitive to the insulin that you naturally produce.

If you miss a dose of Actoplus Met. take it as soon as possible. If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to your regular dosing schedule. Do not take 2 doses at once.

Store this medicine at room temperature at 77 degrees F (25 degrees C) in a tightly-closed container, away from heat, moisture, and light. Brief storage between 59 and 86 degrees F (15 and 30 degrees C) is permitted.

Do NOT use Actoplus Met if: you are allergic to any ingredient in Actoplus Met you have type 1 diabetes you have moderate to severe heart failure you have a severe infection, low blood oxygen levels, kidney or liver problems, or high blood ketone or acid levels (eg, diabetic ketoacidosis), or you are severely dehydrated you have had a stroke or a recent heart attack, or you are in shock you are 80 years old or more and have not had a kidney function test you will be having surgery or certain lab procedures you have a history of liver problems, including jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes), during therapy with a similar medicine called troglitazone

Contact your doctor or health care provider right away if any of these apply to you.

Some medical conditions may interact with Actoplus Met. Tell your doctor or pharmacist if you have any medical conditions, especially if any of the following apply to you: if you are pregnant, planning to become pregnant, or are breast-feeding if you are taking any prescription or nonprescription medicine, herbal preparation, or dietary supplement if you have allergies to medicines, foods, or other substances if you have a history of heart problems (eg, heart failure), abnormal liver function tests, lung or breathing problems, thyroid problems, stomach or bowel problems (eg, paralysis, blockage), adrenal or pituitary problems, eye or vision problems (eg, macular degeneration), bladder cancer, or lactic acidosis if you have fluid retention or swelling problems, vomiting, diarrhea, poor health or nutrition, low blood calcium or vitamin B12 levels, or anemia, or if you are dehydrated if you have an infection, fever, recent injury, or moderate to severe burns if you have a history of bone fracture, weak bones (eg, osteoporosis), or low calcium intake if you drink alcohol or have a history of alcohol abuse if you will be having surgery or certain lab procedures if you take a beta-blocker (eg, propranolol) Some MEDICINES MAY INTERACT with Actoplus Met. Tell your health care provider if you are taking any other medicines, especially any of the following: Amiloride, cimetidine, digoxin, morphine, procainamide, quinidine, quinine, ranitidine, triamterene, trimethoprim, or vancomycin because they may increase the risk of Actoplus Met 's side effects Calcium channel blockers (eg, nifedipine), corticosteroids (eg, prednisone), diuretics (eg, furosemide, hydrochlorothiazide), estrogen, hormonal contraceptives (eg, birth control pills), insulin, isoniazid, nicotinic acid, oral antidiabetics (eg, glipizide), phenothiazines (eg, chlorpromazine), phenytoin, sympathomimetics (eg, albuterol, pseudoephedrine), or thyroid hormones (eg, levothyroxine) because the risk of high or low blood sugar may be increased Gemfibrozil because it may increase the risk of Actoplus Met 's side effects Rifampin because it may decrease Actoplus Met 's effectiveness, resulting in high blood sugar Anticoagulants (eg, warfarin) because their effectiveness may be decreased or the risk of their side effects may be increased by Actoplus Met

Possible Side Effects

All medicines may cause side effects, but many people have no, or minor, side effects. Check with your doctor if any of these most COMMON side effects persist or become bothersome: Cold-like symptoms; diarrhea; headache; indigestion; mild weight gain; nausea; stomach upset.

Seek medical attention right away if any of these SEVERE side effects occur: Severe allergic reactions (rash; hives; itching; difficulty breathing; tightness in the chest; swelling of the mouth, face, lips, or tongue); blurred vision or other vision changes; bone pain; chest pain or discomfort; dark urine; difficult or painful urination; dizziness or lightheadedness; fainting; fast or difficult breathing; feeling of being unusually cold; general feeling of being unwell; muscle pain or weakness; pale stools; persistent loss of appetite; severe or persistent headache, nausea, or vomiting; shortness of breath; slow or irregular heartbeat; sudden unexplained weight gain; swelling of the hands, ankles, or feet; unusual stomach pain or discomfort; unusual drowsiness; unusual tiredness or weakness; yellowing of the eyes or skin.

If you have any questions about Actoplus Met. please talk with your doctor, pharmacist, or other health care provider. Actoplus Met is to be used only by the patient for whom it is prescribed. Do not share it with other people. If your symptoms do not improve or if they become worse, check with your doctor. If using Actoplus Met for an extended period of time, obtain refills before your supply runs out.

Clarithromycin 250mg tablets, clonocid

CLARITHROMYCIN 250MG TABLETS

Transcript

PATIENT INFORMATION LEAFLET ON

Klaricid® 250mg tablets Clarithroymcin 250mg tablets (clarithroymcin) Read all of this leaflet carefully before you start taking this medicine. • Keep this leaflet. You may need to read it again. • If you have further questions, ask your doctor or your pharmacist. • This medicine has been prescribed for you. Do not pass it on to others. It may harm them, even if their symptoms are the same as yours. • If any of the side effects gets serious, or if you notice any side effects not listed in this leaflet, please tell your doctor or pharmacist. • Your medicine is available using either of the above names but will be referred to as Klaricid tablets throughout the remainder of this leaflet. • Klaricid tablets are also available in other strengths. In this leaflet: 1) What Klaricid tablets are and what they are used for 2) Before taking Klaricid tablets 3) Taking Klaricid tablets 4) Possible side effects 5) How to store Klaricid tablets 6) Further information 1) WHAT KLARICID TABLETS ARE AND WHAT THEY ARE USED FOR Each Klaricid tablet contains 250 mg or 500 mg of the active ingredient clarithromycin. Klaricid belongs to a group of medicines called macrolide antibiotics. Antibiotics stop the growth of bacteria (bugs) which cause infections. Klaricid tablets are used to treat infections such as: 1. Chest infections such as bronchitis and pneumonia 2. Throat and sinus infections 3. Skin and tissue infections 4. Helicobacter pylori infection associated with duodenal ulcer

• nateglinide, pioglitazone, repaglinide, rosiglitazone or insulin (used to lower blood glucose levels) • theophylline (used in patients with breathing difficulties such as asthma) • triazolam, alprazolam or midazolam (sedatives) • cilostazol (for poor circulation) • omeprazole (for treatment of indigestion and gastric ulcers) unless your doctor has prescribed it for you to treat Helicobacter pylori infection associated with duodenal ulcer • methylprednisolone (a corticosteroid) • vinblastine (for treatment of cancer) • ciclosporin, sirolimus and tacrolimus (immune suppressants) • etravirine, efavirenz, nevirapine, ritonavir, zidovudine, atazanavir, saquinavir (anti-viral drugs used in the treatment of HIV) • rifabutin, rifampicin, rifapentine, fluconazole, itraconazole (used in the treatment of certain bacterial infections) • tolterodine (for overactive bladder) • verapamil (for high blood pressure) • sildenafil, vardenafil and tadalafil (for impotence in adult males or for use in pulmonary arterial hypertension (high blood pressure in the blood vessels of the lung)) • St John’s Wort (a herbal product used to treat depression) Klaricid does not interact with oral contraceptives. Pregnancy and breast-feeding If you are pregnant, think you may be pregnant, or if you are breastfeeding, consult your doctor before taking Klaricid tablets as the safety of Klaricid tablets in pregnancy and breast-feeding is not known. Driving and Using Machines: Klaricid tablets may make you feel dizzy or drowsy. If they affect you in this way do not drive, operate machinery or do anything that requires you to be alert.

Klaricid Tablets are indicated in adults and children 12 years and older. 3) TAKING KLARICID TABLETS 2) BEFORE TAKING KLARICID TABLETS Do not take Klaricid tablets if you; • know that you are allergic to clarithromycin, other macrolide antibiotics such as erythromycin or azithromycin, or any of the other ingredients in the tablets. • are taking medicines called ergotamine or dihydroergotamine tablets or use ergotamine inhalers for migraine. • are taking medicines called terfenadine or astemizole (widely taken for hay fever or allergies) or cisapride (for stomach disorders) or pimozide (for mental health problems) as combining these drugs can sometimes cause serious disturbances in heart rhythm. • are taking lovastatin or simvastatin (HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors, commonly known as statins, used to lower levels of cholesterol (a type of fat) in the blood). • have low levels of potassium in the blood (a condition known as hypokalaemia). • have severe liver disease with kidney disease. • have an irregular heart rhythm. Klaricid tablets are not suitable for use in children under 12 years of age. Take special care with Klaricid tablets; • if you have any liver or kidney problems • if you have, or are prone to, fungal infections (e. g. thrush) • if you are pregnant or breast feeding If any of these apply to you, consult your doctor before taking Klaricid tablets. Taking other medicines You should not take Klaricid tablets if you are taking any of the medicines listed in the section above “Do not take Klaricid tablets if you;” Tell your doctor if you are taking any of the following medicines as your dose may need to be changed or you may need to have regular tests performed: • digoxin, quinidine or disopyramide (for heart problems) • warfarin (for thinning the blood) • carbamazepine, valproate, phenobarbital or phenytoin (for epilepsy) • atorvastatin, rosuvastatin (HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors, commonly known as statins, and used to lower levels of cholesterol (a type of fat) in the blood) • colchicine (usually taken for gout)

Do not give these tablets to children under 12 years. Your doctor will prescribe another suitable medicine for your child. Always take Klaricid tablets exactly as your doctor has told you. You should check with your doctor or pharmacist if you are not sure. The usual dose is; For chest infections, throat or sinus infections and skin and soft tissue infections: Usual dose of Klaricid tablets for adults and children over 12 years is 250 mg twice daily for 6 to 14 days, e. g. one 250 mg tablet in the morning and one in the early evening. Your doctor may increase the dose to 500 mg twice daily in severe infections. Klaricid tablets should be swallowed with at least half a glass of water. For the treatment of Helicobacter pylori infection associated with duodenal ulcers: There are a number of effective treatment combinations available to treat Helicobacter pylori in which Klaricid tablets are taken together with one or two other drugs. These combinations include the following and are usually taken for 6 to 14 days: a) One Klaricid 500 mg tablet taken twice a day together with amoxycillin, 1000 mg taken twice a day plus lansoprazole, 30 mg twice a day. b) One Klaricid 500 mg tablet taken twice a day together with metronidazole, 400 mg taken twice a day plus lansoprazole, 30 mg twice a day. c) One Klaricid 500 mg tablet taken twice a day together with amoxycillin, 1000 mg taken twice a day or metronidazole, 400 mg taken twice a day plus omeprazole, 40 mg a day. d) One Klaricid 500 mg tablet taken twice a day together with amoxycillin, 1000 mg taken twice a day plus omeprazole, 20 mg taken once a day. e) One Klaricid 500 mg tablet taken three times a day together with omeprazole 40 mg taken once a day. The treatment combination that you receive may differ slightly from the above. Your doctor will decide which treatment combination is the most suitable for you. If you are unsure which tablets you should be taking or how long you should be taking them for, please consult your doctor for advice. If you take more Klaricid tablets than you should If you accidentally take more Klaricid tablets in one day than your doctor has told you to, or if a child accidentally swallows some tablets, contact your doctor or nearest hospital emergency department immediately. An overdose of Klaricid tablets is likely to cause vomiting and stomach pains.

If you forget to take Klaricid tablets If you forget to take a Klaricid tablet, take one as soon as you remember. Do not take more tablets in one day than your doctor has told you to. Do not stop taking Klaricid tablets, even if you feel better. It is important to take the tablets for as long as the doctor has told you to, otherwise the problem might come back. 4) POSSIBLE SIDE EFFECTS Like all medicines, Klaricid tablets can cause side effects although not everybody gets them. If you suffer from any of the following at any time during your treatment STOP TAKING your tablets and contact your doctor immediately: • severe or prolonged diarrhoea, which may have blood or mucus in it. Diarrhoea may occur over two months after treatment with clarithromycin, in which case you should still contact your doctor. • a rash, difficulty breathing, fainting or swelling of the face and throat. This is a sign that you may have developed an allergic reaction. • yellowing of the skin (jaundice), skin irritation, pale stools, dark urine, tender abdomen or loss of appetite. These may be signs that your liver may not be working properly. • severe skin reactions such as blistering of the skin, mouth, lips, eyes and genitals (symptoms of a rare allergic reaction called StevensJohnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis). • Henoch-Schonlein purpura (a rash which appears as purple spots on the skin). Common side effects of Klaricid tablets include; • headache • difficulty sleeping • changes in sense of taste • stomach problems such as feeling sick, vomiting, stomach pain, indigestion, diarrhoea • a change in the way your liver works • skin rash • increased sweating Other less common side effects include: • swelling, redness or itchiness of the skin. Sometimes brown scales may appear • acne • Henoch-Schonlein purpura (a rash which appears as purple spots on the skin). • oral or vaginal ‘thrush’ (a fungal infection) • reduction in the level of certain blood cells (which can make infections more likely or increase the risk of bruising or bleeding) • loss of appetite, heartburn, bloating, constipation, wind • inflammation of the pancreas • anxiety, nervousness, drowsiness, tiredness, dizziness, tremor or shaking • confusion, loss of bearings, hallucinations (seeing things), change in sense of reality or panicking, depression, abnormal dreams or nightmares • convulsion (fits) • ringing in the ears or hearing loss • vertigo • paraesthesia, more commonly known as ‘pins and needles’ • leaking of blood from blood vessels (haemorrhage) • inflammation of the mouth or tongue • discolouration of the tongue or teeth • dry mouth • loss of taste or smell or inability to smell properly • joint pain • muscle pain or loss of muscle tissue. If you suffer from myasthenia gravis (a condition in which the muscles become weak and tire easily) or rhabdomyolysis (a condition which causes the breakdown of muscle tissue), clarithromycin may worsen these symptoms • chest pain or changes in heart rhythm such as palpitations • a change in the levels of products made by the liver, inflammation of the liver or an inability of the liver to function properly (you may notice yellowing of the skin, dark urine, pale stools or itchiness of the skin) • a change in the levels of products produced by the kidney, inflammation of the kidney or an inability of the kidney to function properly (you may notice tiredness, swelling or puffiness in the face, abdomen, thighs or ankles or problems with urination) • low blood sugar levels • a change in the levels of certain cells or products found in the blood. Consult your doctor immediately if you develop any of these problems or have any other unexpected or unusual symptoms. Reporting of side effects If you get any side effects, talk to your doctor, pharmacist or nurse. This includes any possible side effects not listed in this leaflet. You can also report side effects directly via the Yellow Card Scheme at: www. mhra. gov. uk/yellowcard. By reporting side effects, you can help provide more information on the safety of this medicine.

5) HOW TO STORE KLARICID TABLETS • Keep out of sight and reach of children. • Do not use these tablets after their use-by (exp) date that is printed on the box and on the blister label. • Do not store above 25°C. • Store in the original package • Store in a dry place and protect from light. • If your medicine becomes discoloured or shows any sign of deterioration, return it to your pharmacist. • Medicines should not be disposed of via wastewater or household waste. Ask your pharmacist how to dispose of medicines no longer required. These measures will help to protect the environment. 6) FURTHER INFORMATION What Klaricid tablets contain Each film-coated tablet contains 250 mg clarithromycin. The other ingredients are: croscarmellose sodium, starch pregelatinised, cellulose microcrystalline, povidone, colloidal silicon dioxide, stearic acid, magnesium stearate, talc, quinoline yellow (E104), hypromellose, hydroxypropylcellulose, propylene glycol, sorbitan monooleate, vanillin, titanium dioxide (E171) and sorbic acid. What Klaricid tablets look like and contents of the pack Klaricid tablets are yellow, ovaloid film-coated tablets, plain on both sides. Klaricid tablets are supplied in calendar packs containing 14 tablets. Manufactured by Abbott S. r.l. 104010 Campoverde di Aprilia, Italy. It is procured from within the EU by PL Holder: MPT Pharma Ltd, Westgate Business Park, Unit 5-7 Tintagel Way, Aldridge, Walsall WS9 8ER Repackaged by MPT Pharma Ltd. PL: 33532/0461

Klaricid 250mg tablets Clarithroymcin 250mg tablets

Leaflet date 9 March 2014 Leaflet code: xxxxxxxxxxxxxxx Klaricid is a registered trade mark of XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX.

Source: Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency

Disclaimer: Every effort has been made to ensure that the information provided here is accurate, up-to-date and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. Drug information contained herein may be time sensitive. This information has been compiled for use by healthcare practitioners and consumers in the United States. The absence of a warning for a given drug or combination thereof in no way should be construed to indicate that the drug or combination is safe, effective or appropriate for any given patient. If you have questions about the substances you are taking, check with your doctor, nurse or pharmacist.

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